Vote for the Finalists in Dwell Magazine’s Reburbia Design Contest

flying_prt.jpgAirbia: The PRT of the future? I mean, of the future future?

The good people at Dwell Magazine and Inhabitat.com have narrowed submissions in their Reburbia: A Suburban Design Competition to the top twenty proposals for re-envisioning the sprawl that blights the American landscape and keeps us locked in our foreign-oil dependent, ever-expanding commute patterns.

From their announcement:

In a future where limited natural resources will force us to find better solutions for density and efficiency, what will become of the cul-de-sacs, cookie-cutter tract houses and generic strip malls that have long upheld the diffuse infrastructure of suburbia? How can we redirect these existing spaces to promote sustainability, walkability, and community? What would a McMansion become if it weren’t a single-family dwelling? How could a vacant big box store be retrofitted for agriculture? What sort of design solutions can you come up with to facilitate car-free mobility, ‘burb-grown food, and local, renewable energy generation?

While there are some very interesting proposals–like turning old big-box stores into residential units and converting freeway signs into horizontal windmills to generate electricity from the movement of cars–there are some other proposals that make personal rapid transit (PRT) look anachronistic.

Actually, it’s the blimp transport proposal that currently has the most votes, so maybe you want to go over to the site and vote for something more practical?

freeway_windmill.jpgParasite Catalyst: Converting freeway signs into wind turbines.

big_box.jpgLivablox: Turning big box stores into container homes.

  • soylatte

    Man, the comments on that site are startling. Just one gem from the blimp discussion:

    “it’s so dissapointing to see that some people just don’t ever want to give the chance for the imagination to take over realism. I love this project. I am so glad these people had the guts to propose something like that. We need these ideas. We need to keep thinking of ways to change and at the same time learning from the findings of the past. Amazing work guys.”

    True dat… realism is the LAST thing we need when discussing future transportation.

  • Either you’re misreading the voting page or I am… from here it looks like the much more realistic Urban Sprawl Repair Kit has the most votes (1245 vs. 625).

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