The Importance of Child Care Within Walking Distance

In honor of International Walk to School Day,
we’re going to look at a post from Minnesota’s Twin Cities about what
you might call Wouldn’t It Be Great If You Could Walk Your Kid to
Preschool Day.

Streetsblog Network member Net Density
makes the excellent point that for parents of preschool-age children,
having child care within a quarter-mile of their homes can be the
make-or-break factor in whether they choose an active commute (by foot,
bike, or transit).

After some impressive number-crunching,
the blog’s author comes up with the conclusion that only between 13 and
16 percent of people in Minneapolis-St. Paul live within that distance
of adequate child care options. Which makes for a planning challenge:

2CCBlocks_300x231.jpgMost people don’t make housing decisions based on child care
access, so depending on what you can afford, and where you want to
locate, good child care access may or may not be available in your area.

So as planners and policy makers trying to leverage the multiple
benefits of a non-auto commute (health, environmental, social), what
role do we have in trying to improve this access? Or, in other words,
how can we address this barrier and allow more people to get active? What tools can we use to do so?

Anyone out there want to step forward with some ideas? We’re listening.

More from the network: Cincy Streetcar Blog
has an excellent photo essay that makes a case against Issue 9, an
anti-passenger rail initiative on the ballot in that city this fall. Bicycle Ambassadors demonstrates some justified pride about Philadelphia’s bike commute numbers. And Portlandize takes on the question of who pays for bike infrastructure — and auto infrastructure.

  • Gillian Gillett

    Tomorrow’s noontime forum at SPUR (654 Mission Street) will be about this very subject.

    Families in San Francisco face unique challenges finding affordable, safe and quality care. The dilemma is even more intense for low-income families and those with children with special needs, adding yet one more factor to San Francisco’s “family flight” problems. Michael Williams, Deputy Director of Programs, and other professionals from Children’s Council of San Francisco, will describe some of the realities facing families, as well as some solutions and potential policy directions.

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