Streetfilms: NYC Biking Up Big for Two Years Running

This year the New York City Department of Transportation measured a 26 percent jump in commuter cycling. Coming on the heels of 2008’s unprecedented 35 percent growth, that puts the total two-year increase at a whopping 66 percent.

Much of the growth in cycling can be attributed to the installation of 200 miles of bike routes in the past three years, including innovative facilities like the cycletracks on Eighth Avenue and Ninth Avenue, which separate car traffic from cyclists. Safer streets get more people to ride, who encourage their friends to ride, and more riders on the road means cyclists are more visible and safer. The virtuous circle is in effect here in New York.

With triple the number of cyclists on the road since 2000, we thought now would be a good time to get a reality check from riders: How’s it going out there? Overwhelmingly, folks we interviewed said it is getting quite crowded on New York’s streets and bridges. Good thing bikes aren’t space hogs!

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Kit Hodge, Arielle Fleisher. Brian Wiedenmeier, Jamie Parks , and Luis Montoya at SPUR's event on the state of bicycling. All photos Streetsblog/Rudick unless otherwise noted.

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