Fort Worth Commits to Radical New Bike Plan

We got an e-mail late last night from Kevin Buchanan, who runs the Fort Worthology blog down in Fort
Worth, Texas, with some very good news for that city’s streets. Here’s
what Kevin had to report:

4344827991_48d6c88500.jpgSupporters of Fort Worth’s
new bike plan packed city council chambers last night. (Photo: Kevin
Buchanan)

[A]fter a huge turnout of support from local bike
riders, including the newly formed Bike Friendly Fort Worth, the Fort
Worth city council unanimously approved the radical new Bike Fort Worth
bicycle transportation plan. This plan will, among other things,
massively increase Fort Worth’s bike infrastructure from its current
state of just over 100 miles (emphasis on recreational trails) to nearly
1,000 miles (the vast majority of which will be on-street bike lanes
and sharrow routes). Big, big news for Fort Worth’s livable streets
movement. After the vote, the entire council chamber erupted in a
standing ovation.

A couple of days ago, Kevin wrote a post
detailing what’s in the new plan. It represents an impressive
commitment to people who use bicycles for transportation as well as
recreation:

Under Bike Fort Worth, it is proposed that the bicycle
transportation
network be radically enlarged, and a much greater focus be given to
on-street infrastructure. Under the proposal, Fort Worth’s bicycle
transportation network would increase from the existing 102.6 miles to
924.7 miles. 224.7 miles of that would be off-street paths &
trails, with the other 700 miles being dedicated to on-street
infrastructure: 480.3 miles of on-street dedicated bike lanes, 218.3
miles of on-street signed routes (sharrow routes), and 1.4 miles of bus
& bike-only lanes in Downtown Fort Worth.

This is a huge victory for all the people in Forth Worth who have
advocated for more livable streets in that city. Congratulations to Fort
Worthology and all the rest of you.

More from around the network: At The Bellows, Ryan Avent
has a defense of the vehicle miles traveled tax. Mobilizing
the Region
reports on how Westchester County, New York, is throwing
away opportunities to support bicycling. And readers at Urban Review STL are
not impressed with a new speed camera in a school zone there.

  • ZA

    I hate to admit that Texans are kicking San Francisco’s behind, but it’s all for the good. I hope Fort Worth will match the enforcement and outreach resources to this build-out.

  • KC

    Is it safe to assume that Fort Worth tax dollars are going to be used to make all these improvements for recreational biking? Sounds like there are going to be other layoffs in these down times to meet the budget requirement for Bike trails. Oh I know, why don’t we start an inspection, registration and highway use fees to fund these recreational bike trails rather than cut income from the working people of Fort Worth. If the City has that much surplus, I feel relatively sure that the school teachers, firemen and policemen( I know the last two aren’t politically correct but get over it ) would appreciate a well deserved play raise!

  • R

    I think this is an amazing thing for Fort Worth! Biking is not just recreational, it’s a great mode of transportation. Quit pumping gas into those oversized SUVs and pick-ups, get off your butt and get some exercise and save some money in the process! It’s good for you and it’s good for the environment. It is a fantastic idea to promote biking in a place where people are in the lazy habit of driving everywhere, even if the destination is within a few blocks. I’m not trying to be harsh… I grew up in Fort Worth, so I know how it is. I live in San Francisco now, bike everywhere, and absolutely love it.

  • KC – did you actually read the article..? The vast majority is for transportation.