Search for Rampaging Driver Who Struck Four Cyclists in Mission, Potrero

Bicycle_rampage_photo_small.jpgPhoto: Troy Holden. H/T SFist.
San Francisco police are still searching for the driver of a Nissan Rogue who ran down four cyclists last night over the course of several minutes, before crashing his vehicle into a pole and fleeing on foot.

The SFPD could only describe the driver as a white male of unknown age. Police received reports of a suspect hitting the first cyclist, identified only as a 39-year-old white male, at 9:43 pm in the 2700 block of Harrison Street (between 23rd and 24th Streets). The driver then ran down the next cyclist, a 40-year-old Hispanic male, in the 2800 block of Harrison Street (between 24th and 25th Streets), then a 33-year-old Asian male at the intersection of 23rd and Pennsylvania Streets, and finally, at 9:49 pm a 25-year-old white male at 17th and Missouri Streets.

One of the victims hit his head and was knocked unconscious, another broke a leg. Three of the victims were transported to San Francisco General Hospital, while the fourth refused treatment at the scene. Police said none of the victims suffered "life-threatening injuries" but KCBS reported three victims were still hospitalized, one in critical condition. 

"He (the driver) changed lanes in traffic, he went on the wrong side of the street," SFPD spokesperson Lt. Lyn Tomioka told the Bay City News. "Witnesses said he was driving to try and hit the bicyclists."

The suspect was lost in the area last night, but inspectors have been searching for him since, according to the SFPD. An update is expected later this morning.

UPDATE: 11:00 am

While SFPD has no news to report on the search for the driver, San Francisco General Hospital spokesperson Rachel Kagen told Streetsblog one of the cyclists is in critical condition, one is in serious condition and one is in fair condition. None of the cyclists has granted permission to SF General to give out any more information to media. We'll give you further information as it comes in.