Which SF Neighborhoods Have the Strongest Walkable Magnetism?

Image: ##http://www.7x7.com/arts/buy-our-july-neighborhoods-issue-cover-poster##7x7 Magazine##

Walkability, transit access, good local schools — San Franciscans clamor to live in neighborhoods with features like these.

Potrero Hill artist Wendy MacNaughton’s “mental map” of the city lists the strongest qualities of seven areas that stand out for her, among them SoMa’s “best transit access in town” and the “convenient, walkable, easy everything” nature of Lower Pacific Heights and the Fillmore area.

It’s no wonder, considering such characteristics correlate strongly with happiness. Unfortunately, walkable neighborhoods are a scarce resource in this country, which means living in one can come at a high price.

I spotted a copy of the poster hanging in the cafe at City Hall, where an employee pointed out that it was featured on the July 2010 cover of 7×7 Magazine, which commissioned MacNaughton to create the map.

  • peternatural

    NOPA = “most square footage for your money”.

    What the heck? NOPA is both central and highly walkable. As a result, rental apartments and condos both command premium prices. If you want more square feet for your money, try more remote areas like the outer Sunset, South San Francisco… or Oakland 😉

  • Guest

    Soma has the best transit access? If you live close to Market sure but there is a highway that runs through the rest of the area significantly reducing walkability and easy transit access.

  • mikesonn

    If you look where the number is, then yeah that area is the best. East of 4th/5th to the water and south two-three blocks from Market. Then the black hole that is I-80 and onto the ball park and Caltrain area.

    And really, it’s all about where you want your transit to get you to.

  • Anonymous

    My outer Sunset neighborhood is quite walkable, with shops, restaurants, and a supermarket. The streets are safe even for an old fart like me walking solo at 2am (unlike the Mission, where I once got hit in the head walking in broad daylight).

    Muni lines 71, 71L, 16X, N, Nx, L, 28, 28L, 29, 66, 48 are all in a 12 minute walk radius.

    Still, my walkable neighborhood will always be slammed to the suburbs by holier NOPA hipsters.

  •  The pockets of shops and restaurants in the Outer Sunset are great, but there are many locations that are several blocks from anything.

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