Adorable Scenes From a Record-Breaking Walk and Roll to School Day

Photo: ##http://www.williammercermcleod.com/##William McLeod##

A record-breaking 13,000 students at 76 SF schools reportedly participated in International Walk and Roll to School Day yesterday, including over a hundred little ones who formed a “walking school bus” at E.R. Taylor Elementary, where city officials held a press event.

At E.R. Taylor, which holds walking buses every week as part of the Safe Routes to School program, 52 percent of students live within one mile of school and 38 percent walk, according to the Department of Public Health. Compare that with the citywide stats: 42 percent of SF elementary school students live within a mile of school, but only 26 percent walk.

Sandy Chow, E.R. Taylor parent, said walking with her son Liam allows them to “spend more time together, talking and connecting with each other. That helps prepare my son with the confidence to begin his day.”

"Chief Suhr asking the students which is better, cars going fast? Or, cars going slow... consensus -- cars going slow!" Photo via ##https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151637658670863&set=a.10151637622735863.1073741836.136849650862&type=3&l=4be4fd3e3d&theater##Walk SF on Facebook##
Walk SF's ##http://sf.streetsblog.org/2013/09/13/nicole-schneider-to-succeed-elizabeth-stampe-as-director-of-walk-sf/##new executive director##, Nicole Schneider. Photo: ##http://www.williammercermcleod.com/##William McLeod##
  • Anonymous

    David King, Assistant Professor at Columbia University’s GSAPP (Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation) posted this comment about Target parking to the Shoupistas website.

    David King In NYC Target has opened a few stores where the city has required obscene amounts of parking (in the development, not for individual stores). Two of the stores in the Bronx (near Yankee Stadium) and in East Harlem are the largest parking structures in the city. The parking is not free at about $4.50 for up to three hours. I make a habit of walking through the structures from time time to time just to take pictures of all of the empty spaces, and they are always empty. However, the people shopping at these centers, which have Target, Costco, ToyrUs, etc., are not choosing to drive or take transit. They get there as they can but then take taxis home. Here is a picture I took that shows the queue. There are dozens of cars waiting to pick people and their goods up. If we want to reduce parking supplied we have to provide alternatives that appeal to shoppers, and getting on transit or a bike with Target bags isn’t really a good option for many of these trips. Taxis, ridesharing, jitneys and flexible, same day deliveries need to increase. When these developments opened Target supplied neighborhood shuttles for a few months, which I though did quite well but as soon as their agreement to supply them expired then the shuttles stopped. The real problem is how we
    force developers to pay into the transportation system but we only give them one choice as to how to do that: build parking.

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