Map: SFMTA’s 900 On-Street Car-Share Parking Spots Coming Along

A snapshot of the SFMTA’s draft map of 900 proposed on-street car-share parking spots. See the full map [PDF].
Updated with new version of the map here [PDF].

The SFMTA is rolling right along with its plans to reserve 900 on-street parking spots for car-share vehicles, which will bring a convenient alternative to car ownership to more of the city. The agency has published a draft map [PDF] of proposed car-share spaces throughout the city. The map isn’t final, but residents can start to get a sense of where they might see car-share pop up in their neighborhoods starting this year.

The SFMTA Board of Directors gave the green light to the first 25 car-share spots last week, with the rest expected to be approved in batches over the coming months. Dozens more spots have already cleared the first hurdle, having received preliminary approval at bi-weekly SFMTA public engineering hearings.

Car-sharing ultimately frees up more parking spaces. A growing body of national research shows that each car-share vehicle typically replaces nine to 13 private vehicles, and car-share users walk, bike, and take transit more often. The SFMTA says that those findings were confirmed by their experience with both a test program with 12 on-street car-share spots, as well as the hundreds of off-street car-share spots that have been in place for years.

“There’s an opportunity to free up 10,000 parking spots,” said Padden Murphy of Getaround, which allows car owners to rent their vehicles to their neighbors.

The on-street spots will be available to Getaround and to conventional car-share organizations, like ZipCar and City CarShare, that own and maintain fleets of shared vehicles. The on-street car-share program was spearheaded by the SFMTA in partnership with the non-profit City CarShare, which started the earlier on-street car-share pilot in 2011. The current SFMTA initiative extends the pilot by two years and expands its scale.

Nonetheless, the SFMTA Board did hear from a handful of detractors who don’t seem to buy the evidence, arguing instead that the program is an incursion on storage for personal cars and complaining that the SFMTA didn’t adequately notify neighbors about the proposal.

The program “does not treat everyone fairly,” said one man who said he lives at Golden Gate and Pierce Streets, where spots proposed to be placed “15 feet right in front of my front door” were moved after his complaints.

“For those of us who do own a vehicle, parking in these areas is already difficult enough,” he said. “I feel it punishes those of us who work irregular hours.”

Andy Thornley, project manager for the SFMTA, noted that it may appear that “the city sounds like it’s selling curb to private business.”

“I understand that concern, and I would be very resentful of that — but I remind you this is a pilot,” he said. “The SFMTA believes there are many public benefits to car-sharing.”

The SFMTA is still shuffling its proposed car-share spots around in response to public feedback, but overall the agency appears unwavering in its commitment to a smart strategy that will use a sliver of SF’s gargantuan parking supply more efficiently.

“We aren’t going to rely on the extensive academic research that’s already been done in the Bay Area,” said Thornley. “We think it’s a good idea, but we’re conducting this larger pilot to really test those premises.”

The current draft map [PDF], dated June 30, is available from the SFMTA website. The next SFMTA engineering hearing, scheduled on July 11 at 10 a.m., will review 110 proposed car-share parking locations. You can show up at City Hall to speak at the hearing in person, or email the SFMTA about the proposals at sustainable.streets@sfmta.com.

  • The war on cars (With cars) continues! Well played Bike Coalition, well played.

  • LocalYokel

    I’m confused by this map. Can someone clarify…. several spots noted for Haight street itself.

    We have a number of parking lots (McDonalds, Kezar stadium) that already have leased spaces. Why wouldn’t these companies just take more of those spots in private lots?

    Is it because the city is selling spots for less?

    Also, how do we know which spots will be discussed in the City Hall hearings?

  • baklazhan

    If the criticism of this project is that it removes spaces from “public” use and turns them over to “private businesses,” it occurs to me that one way to pre-empt this would be to require the car sharing companies to find local residents to “donate” their share of street parking– something like “I, X, who am entitled to parking on this street, transfer my right to City Car Share”. Maybe have several people do it for each reserved space (since it’s reserved 24 hours a day).

    Doing this would probably be trivial (just ask the existing customers), and it makes the point that if everyone supposedly has an equal right to street parking, car share users are probably getting less than their share, rather than more.

  • coolbabybookworm

    Doesn’t your idea re-enforce the notion that each resident is entitled to a parking space and that they can do whatever they want with it? That said I’d be happy to “give up” my space so that I can have carshare on my block.

  • Andy Thornley

    Here’s an updated draft of the car share parking space proposal map, showing further adjustments as of 6/30/14:

    http://www.sfmta.com/sites/default/files/projects/CSO_Space_Requests_citywide_20140630.pdf

  • Does the project include SF getting data from the car share companies? It would be great if we could quantify actual demographic/customer data from this pilot- things like how many people were using these spots, were they new or existing car sharing users, had they previously owned a car or not, etc. That would be great stuff for figuring out whether to extend the pilot. Often, companies are reluctant to share their proprietary data, but SF has leverage here since it’s our right-of-way.

    A related question- is there a way to ensure that these spaces are additive, i.e., the car sharing companies aren’t using them as an excuse to cut leases with off-street spaces?

  • coolbabybookworm

    Thanks Andy. Now, what do I need to do to get a city car share space on my block?

  • 94103er

    Sorry if I’m out of the loop on this, but was this a request-driven process? [EDIT: Ah yes, now I see the word ‘request’ all over that map]

    I find it frustrating that the southern neighborhoods are neglected, as usual. Bernal Heights gets *two* Zipcar spaces? Portola, zero? Whereas in the Richmond, where everyone also drives to work but most people have working garages (which they often don’t use), on-street carshare will abound.

    It seems like the city’s attitude is that the poor and middle class will park their cars on their lawns and/or sit on slow buses no matter what, so why change anything? If they’re not careful, the NIMBY fear that new housing in the southeast will bring on traffic gridlock will be 100% true.

    EDIT: So perhaps this was entirely driven by requests. I have to wonder, though, if there’s a difficult-to-surmount information gap and/or other difficulties with lower-income, possibly immigrant households accessing the technology or not having sufficient credit, etc. And also, if the city doesn’t figure out other ways to bring car share to the southeast now, will new residents be willing to take a leap of faith and count on it in the future?

  • Thomas

    Yes, These spots were requested due to demand from the Car-sharing organizations. They are required to have at least 15% spots in Zones 2 and 15% spots in Zone 3 (the two rings outside of the downtown/Market St. area).

  • sorry you’ll need to buy a car instead and then bitch and moan when you can’t find a place to park it. Just blame it on bikers, somehow.

  • baklazhan

    I think that’s already a widely-held notion. I would rather replace it with the idea that all residents have an equal claim, not just those who own cars.

  • baklazhan

    Everyone does not drive to work in the Richmond…

    The bus lines connecting the Richmond to downtown carry 100,000 people a day.

  • 94103er

    You are right, of course. I was being deliberately lazy with my wording for dramatic effect.

    That said, a good many of the 36.6 percent of San Franciscans who drive alone to work every day do live in the Richmond. (If anyone can point to how that population’s broken down by neighborhood, thanks!). And not that carshare cars are appropriate for commuting, but I do still wonder why the Richmond continues to abound in transit alternatives and the southeast neighborhoods get forgotten. Same distance to downtown and likely a similar percentage of households that could go car-lite or car-free if there were more options. [And no, I don’t think the T offers much by way of close access for many of these neighborhoods. Too much geographic variation aside from the problems that line has.]

  • I see a reply from Andy Thornley on another post (http://hoodline.com/2014/07/parking-for-private-car-shares-backlash-in-the-haight), which confirms data sharing:

    “Participating car share organizations (City CarShare, Zipcar, and Getaround) will pay monthly permit fees for the parking spaces, and they’ll have to collect and share a lot of data with the SFMTA about how the vehicles are being used, and who’s using them. At the end of two years we’ll evaluate the data and potentially recommend making on-street car sharing a permanent program, if the pilot experience so indicates.”

    Good to hear!

  • baklazhan

    I suspect that the Richmond is significantly denser, both population and business-wise, than the southeast neighborhoods. I know there are statistics of commuting type and other interesting data which are broken down by census tract, but I can’t seem to find them right now.

  • Antoine Quentin Mahan

    THE DEVIL IS TRULY BUSY AND I’M SICK AND TIRED OF HIS MESS TODAY IN THIS CITY…
    MY CONVERTIBLE WAS TOWED TODAY WHILE I WAS IN THE MOVIES IT COST ME $483.00 TO GET IT OUT THEN WHEN I LOOKED AT THE 2 TICKETS THEY GAVE ME, ONE WAS FOR THE METER AND THE OTHER ONE WAS FOR FALSE ALLEGATIONS OF HAVING A FALSE DISABLED PLACARD.
    WHEN YOU THINK THINGS IS GOING OKAY, IT’S TRULY A SET BACK FOR COME BACK FOR A COME UP FOR SOMETHING WAY BIGGER AND BETTER THAN WHAT THE SITUATION IS.
    YEAH I’M UPSET AND IT ALMOST MESSED UP THE REST OF MY DAY, I MANAGED TO GET MY CAR OUT THOUGH AND FILE FOR A HEARING. ONE TICKET COST $880.00 AND THE OTHER WAS $64.00 THAT THEY PLACED ON MY CAR…
    A TEST I SENSED IN THE AIR AND I MUST SAY THAT I’M A FIRM BELIEVER IN GOD AND THIS TOO SHALL PASS AND I’LL GET MY MONEY BACK.

    PRAY FOR ME PLEASE… BE BLESSED FOR THE 4TH WKD. AHEAD AND BE SAFE AS WELL….

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