Proposed East Bay Bike-Share Sites Announced

Proposed bike-share stations near downtown Oakland.
Proposed bike-share stations near downtown Oakland.

Note: This story has been corrected since it was originally posted. Thank you to sharp-eyed readers.

Bay Area Bike Share released a map of proposed sites for bike-share stations in the East Bay today. Proposed sites for expansion into San Francisco and San Jose have already been released, but these are the first ones for Berkeley, Oakland, and Emeryville. The total number of bikes planned in the three cities is 1,300, with 800 of them in Oakland and 100 in Emeryville, to be rolled out by the end of 2017.

Phase 1, about 25 percent of the final East Bay expansion, will include 350 bikes at 34 stations.

Proposed bike-share stations near the UC Berkeley campus.
Proposed bike-share stations near the UC Berkeley campus.

A map of the initial proposed East Bay hubs, available here, shows them mostly sited along a spine between downtown Berkeley and downtown Oakland. Five stations surround the UC Berkeley campus’ south and west sides, with another located across from Berkeley High School and the downtown Y, and a seventh a little further south on Telegraph at Blake street.

From there, the corridor of proposed sites generally follows Telegraph Avenue, incorporating BART stations and outlying hubs along 40th Street into Emeryville and on the western side of Lake Merritt.

Amtrak stations are left out of the first phase, though, and so are the West Oakland and Rockridge BART stations.

It looks like a good start, if your destinations are all near Telegraph or in downtown Oakland. With luck, further expansions to connect these hubs to other destinations will come sooner than later.

Having bike-share available close to the new Telegraph Avenue parking-protected bike lanes will be a game-changer for that area and we hope it will create some urgency to finish the new facilities further towards Temescal.

What do you think? Are these in the right places? Bike-share needs a somewhat dense network of hubs to be useful, but it’s also necessary to put the hubs in places near where people want to go. Is this a good start?

Bay Area Bike Share is still accepting suggestions for station locations here. Comments can be made here, or at local public libraries, which will be presenting information about the expansion at the following times:

From April 26 through May 9, during regular open hours:

  • Berkeley Library

    • Central Branch, 2090 Kittredge St
    • Claremont Branch, 2940 Benvenue Ave
  • Emeryville
    • Town Hall, 1333 Park Ave (through May 11)
  • Oakland Library

    • Main Branch, 125 14th St
    • Asian Branch, 388 9th St

Also on May 3 from 4 to 6 pm, at the Temescal Branch Library, 5205 Telegraph in Oakland.

  • Mike Jones

    Most are along AC Transit’s 1/1R route. Simpler to catch the bus?

  • p_chazz

    I see they are where all the white people are. Black and brown people don’t count, evidently.

  • tiabgood

    Zipcar locations are similar.

  • SF_Abe

    I’m bummed there isn’t a station at the Grand Lake Theater. It seems like the perfect distance from BART for bikeshare.

    I hope these stations generate enough momentum to expand again in a few years

  • murphstahoe

    As we all know, movie goers only drive. You know, in cars. Also, as p_chazz points out – brown people.

  • murphstahoe

    LOL

  • Andy Chow

    I also notice that. The density, distance, and terrain is suitable enough to support a bike share station to serve as a feeder to BART.

  • Mike Jones

    Bike share is more a way of making rich people drive less, than making poor people ride more. Want to ride? Buy a bike.

  • Jeffrey Baker

    Shoot, they got one at Ashby and College but not at Alcatraz/College nor at Rockridge BART. Seems like a missed opportunity to connect the network with just one more station. Looking at the map I have a hard time seeing how I would ever use this system. Maybe it makes more sense to people who are coming in from SF on BART?

  • murphstahoe

    Buy a bike, and a super heavy very expensive lock, and don’t drink at your destination, because you can’t take a cab home.

  • murphstahoe

    “Amtrak stations are left out, though, and so is the West Oakland BART station.”

    If we are going to focus on transit hubs – note that there is a station at the Jack London Sq Ferry. Which is actually pretty close to Amtrak.

  • J

    Way worse than I expected. Low density of stations + low number of stations = a system only useful for a very small number of trips.

    Imagine a bus network with only 3 lines and 34 stops. Not super useful in an area of this size, so don’t expect much use.

  • Mike Jones

    Good points, there are lots of niche markets. However, buses do have bike racks and in at least one “wonderful” European city so do taxis.

  • Kevin M

    The article isn’t accurate. From the website: “Below are the Proposed Expansion Sites for the first phase of Bay Area Bike Share’s expansion. These are just the beginning of what will be a two-year roll out that will grow bike share from 700 bikes to 7,000 bikes in the Bay Area. We have chosen to start in areas that are contiguous with existing stations or are in the downtown areas to be able to serve the maximum number of bike trips from day one and grow outward from there.”

    There are 1,300 bikes planned for the East Bay cities, but they won’t all fit into this first phase, so there will be far more than the 34 proposed stations by the time the full system is in place.

  • Prinzrob

    Correct, the map that was recently released (phase 1) is only 25% of the total bikes and stations, to be installed in 2016. The remaining 75% (phases 2 and 3) will be installed throughout 2017, and are not indicated on this map.

  • Melanie Curry

    I suppose that depends on your definition of “close.” I think it’s a pretty long walk from the ferry to the Amtrak station (which is a whole ‘nother lost opportunity)

  • Prinzrob

    This map shows only phase 1, which is 25% of the total bikes and stations to be installed in the East Bay. The remaining 75% will be installed at additional locations throughout 2017.

  • Prinzrob

    Please see the additional comments on this article. This map only shows phase 1 (2016) including 25% of the bikes to be installed. The remaining 75% (phase 2 and 3) will be installed at additional locations throughout 2017.

  • murphstahoe

    How is the market of “people who don’t want to have their bike stolen” a niche market?

    I lock my bike up outside for hours with no worry with a simple u-lock – but I live in the cuts now. In 15 years in SF I had an extra beater bike at all times in the event I had to ride somewhere and lock up for an extensive period of time. And I still didn’t do that very often. And it was a hassle because I had to take my lights/bag/etc… off the bike. And I had one stolen.

    I still did it, but it added friction to the system where a certain percentage of the time I would MUNI or cab or (gasp) drive because of security hassle. Bike share removes that completely.

  • Prinzrob

    The planned service area extends to West Oakland and Fruitvale. This phase 1 of the rollout includes only 25% of the bikes, and phases 2 and 3 will add additional bikes and stations throughout 2017 at more locations around the city.

  • Prinzrob

    Many more transit hubs, including Amtrak stations, will get bikes in phases 2 and 3 throughout 2017, when the remaining 75% of the bikes and stations will be installed.

  • Prinzrob

    Those additional locations will likely be served in 2017 when phases 2 and 3 of the bike share roll out are implemented. This first phase in 2016 only accounts for 25% of the total bikes and stations to be installed.

  • Prinzrob

    I think the idea is that people can hop on a bike after they get off the bus, for that last mile trip to their destination. Of course, that also means another bike share station has to be at or near their location as well.

  • Prinzrob

    Some of the biggest barriers to bicycling for low income individuals involve theft and repair issues, due to less access to bike shops. Bike share addresses both of these problems. Of course, then there still has to be bikes located at or near the destinations people want to visit, at a price point that they can afford, and with adequate infrastructure for safe bike trips.

  • Flatlander

    The theater owner would probably fight it. Remember when he raised a huge stink over (gasp!) extending parking meter hours?

  • Melanie Curry

    Thanks for the corrections, Kevin and Prinzrob. The website isn’t as clear about future phases as you are here.

  • Melanie Curry

    Bay Area Bike Share has a goal of putting at least 20 percent of the stations in “communities of concern,” which are low-income communities or communities of color as defined by the MTC (http://gis.mtc.ca.gov/samples/Interactive_Maps/cocs.html). Of the 34 proposed stations for Phase 1, they say they’ve sited 16 of them within “communities of concern.”

  • Prinzrob

    Thanks for the update Melanie, and keep up the great work!

  • Jeffrey Baker

    He also raised a huge stink about Grand Ave. road diet.

  • joechoj

    Of course cost is a barrier to using the bike system, especially for low income folks. I know that devising some sort of discount system has been part of the plan for making the system accessible to low income users in the East Bay – but haven’t heard any details. Have you?

  • RichLL

    So there are race quotas for bike share locations? Really?

    And because the voters of this state outlawed race quotas we can just do an end-run around that by instead calling them “communities of concern”?

  • RichLL

    Does the viability of this enterprise depend on perceptions of minimizing shrinkage?

  • Prinzrob

    The current plan is to offer a discount rate of $5/month for low income individuals, but that still comes out to $60 per year. There is some work being done to try to find additional subsidies to lower that cost further, as well as accept more forms of payment and at more locations, making the system accessible for more people.

  • joechoj

    Full price is $88/yr, or $7.33/mo. So $5/mo is about 2/3 full price. Not bad.
    Loss-prevention seems like a tricky issue to work out. People paying by credit card would be foolish to try to steal a bike, since their credit card would be charged some penalty price. I wonder how it would work with other forms of payment.

  • Prinzrob

    Actually the full-price membership is likely going up by a lot, unfortunately. I’ve heard anywhere from $150-180 per year (around $12-15 per month). There may be opportunities for discounts off that price, employer subsidies, etc.

  • Ride your own bike.

  • Yet, even with all those barriers, low-income individuals still tend to do the most biking of all demographics. Something isn’t adding up here.

  • Or maybe the other way around.

  • Melanie Curry

    You should take a minute to look at the MTC definitions before jumping to conclusions about “race quotas.”

  • mx

    Oh come on. Bike share is convenient for short-medium trips within its service area (given the weight of the bikes, I wouldn’t really want to ride them that far) and it pairs well with transit. Yes, we should make sure the system is used by everyone who can benefit from it, including working with community groups to sign people up and offer discounts where possible, but there’s no reason to knock it.

  • Mike Jones

    Meant it as a statement of reality to the existing bikeshare model, used in Paris, London, NYC and here. Not so much as a desire.

  • Mike Jones

    Quite! There aren’t in this phase.

  • murphstahoe

    $60 per year. How much is an AC Transit pass per month?

  • RichLL

    Your link doesn’t work but that’s not even the point here. You responded to a comment here that the bike share locations appear to be in neighborhoods that are mostly white.

    And that may be true. Presumably the backers of this program have done some research about the demographics and economics of those who use bike share and those who do not, and designed the system accordingly. And any casual observer could tell you that most cyclists are white.

    There’s probably not a Brooks Bros or an Abercromblie and Fitch in West Oakland, nor many Afro hair stylists in Pacific Heights either.

    Everything doesn’t have to be everywhere, you know? And, again, you can’t get around Prop 209’s prohibition of race quotas by simply using thinly-veiled surrogates and euphemisms for race.

  • J

    I see. Thanks for the update. I’ll withhold judgement until I see the plans for the full expansion. I can say that it will need to be much bigger and denser than this to be successful, but hopefully that will be achieved through the larger rollout.

  • murphstahoe

    The only community of concern I see is the 4 foot circle around you – you have very deep concerns for quite a few topics

  • Prinzrob

    AC Transit has the Easy Pass program for schools and companies, but nothing for individuals. As such if someone maxes out the $5 “day pass” rate each work day for a full month it will cost them around $100, or upwards of $1000 per year.

  • Melanie Curry

    Link to map above fixed. “Communities of Concern” include large percentages of low-income, disabled, senior, single-parent, rent-burdened, limited-English-proficient, zero-vehicle, and minority residents.
    Not a perfect measure, but a pretty solid attempt to identify those communities whose residents shoulder a higher burden of health issues and lack of access than other communities, so as to make sure they are not left behind when we make investments and improvements.

  • I saw that on the marque, even.

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