Skip to content

Posts from the Pedestrian Safety Category

9 Comments

SFMTA Gets Input on Plans for a Better Embarcadero

The current green striped, door-death lane on Embarcadero. Photo: Streetsblog

The current green-striped, unprotected lane on Embarcadero. Photo: Streetsblog

Yesterday evening, the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency held an open house, at Pier 1 on the Embarcadero, to get public feedback for the Embarcadero Enhancement Project. From the SFMTA website:

The SFMTA, Port of San Francisco, San Francisco Planning Department and San Francisco Public Works Department are collaborating on a planning project that will increase safety and comfort of travel along The Embarcadero. Working with the community, the Embarcadero Enhancement Project seeks to develop a Complete Streets conceptual design and cost estimate that includes a bikeway along The Embarcadero from AT&T Park at King Street to the Fisherman’s Wharf area. A bikeway is a bicycle facility that is physically separated from moving or parked vehicles and pedestrians.

The meeting was split into two spaces to showcase and discuss two alternatives for the street. In one room, seen in the first photo after the break, was a “complete streets” plan that would put a curbside, protected bike lane on both sides of the Embarcadero. The other plan is exploring a bi-directional lane on the seaside promenade.
Read more…

15 Comments

San Mateo’s Highway 101/92 Interchange Eyed for Expansion

Another set of ramps even higher than the Highway 101/92 interchange's existing flyover ramps is among the potential traffic expansions under consideration by San Mateo County planners. Photo: Google Maps

Another set of ramps even higher than the Highway 101/92 interchange’s existing flyover is among the potential traffic expansions under consideration. Photo: Google Maps

San Mateo County’s transportation agencies are forging ahead with environmental studies of new lanes, ramps, and overpasses to add to the already massive interchange at Highways 101 and 92 in the city of San Mateo. Building on four previous studies stretching back to 2001, a new $500,000 study completed in June analyzed 25 different traffic expansion projects to remedy the interchanges “deficiencies” in carrying huge traffic volumes.

“Here’s a list of four short-term projects for $14 million, or we could start making investments in longer-term solutions,” explained county Transportation Authority (SMCTA) Director Joe Hurley to the agency’s Board of Directors last Thursday. “Based on how you want to package them, you could go with a $146 million project or you could go as high as a $353 million project.”

The “solutions” identified as winners by SMCTA include widening the existing partial cloverleaf on-ramps to two lanes, building new “direct connector” overpass ramps or adding new Highway 101 frontage roads and on-ramps [PDF]. The potential of the proposed traffic expansions to fix safety hazards that motorists currently face in navigating the interchange was also evaluated.

Read more…

1 Comment

Sunday Streets Embarcadero: A Moment to Bring People Together

This post supported by

How better to spend a Sunday afternoon than pedaling along the Embarcadero and unleashing a mass of bubbles? Photo: Streetsblog

How better to spend a Sunday afternoon than pedaling along the Embarcadero while unleashing a mass of bubbles? Photo: Streetsblog

Sunday afternoon was the last “Sunday Streets” of the season, on Embarcadero in downtown San Francisco. This time the event, which went from 11 to 4 p.m., ran from AT&T Park to Broadway. The Embarcadero is where “Sunday Streets” first started in San Francisco, back in 2008.

Kelsey Ziomek, Allie Foraker and Danielle Morantte with the Girl Gang. Photo: Streetsblog

Kelsey Ziomek, Allie Foraker, and Danielle Morantte with the Girl Gang. Photo: Streetsblog

Read more…

No Comments

SPUR talk on Local Measures: BART Bond Passes, Mixed Results on Others

This post supported by

Alex Clemens and David Latterman hosted a packed house at SPUR's SF center. Photo: Streetsblog

Alex Clemens and David Latterman hosted a packed house at SPUR’s SF center. Photo: Streetsblog

This afternoon, the San Francisco Bay Area Planning and Urban Research Association (SPUR), hosted a post-election analysis of local races and measures with political consultants David Latterman of Fall Line Analytics and Alex Clemens of Lighthouse Public Affairs.

Clemens started off his presentation and summed up the mood in the room with a single word: “sh*t!”

That was all they had to say about the national election, at least at the start of the presentation. They quickly moved on to a breakdown of San Francisco’s complex ballot, with its 25 measures and several local races, some of them not yet definitively decided at the time of the presentation.

“Turnout was 53 percent so far, but will get to around 76 percent as the last ballots are counted,” explained Latterman. He said that’s the largest turnout since 2008. Read more…

1 Comment

San Mateo County Bike-Ped Advisory Boards Seek Applicants

Bike parking and access to trains for people bringing bicycles on-board are among the issues discussed by Caltrain's Bicycle Advisory Committee. Photo: Andrew Boone

Bike parking and on-board storage are issues discussed by Caltrain’s Bicycle Advisory Committee. Photo: Andrew Boone

Deadlines are near for several Board and Committee positions in San Mateo County. Applications are due today for two vacancies on the SamTrans Board of Directors, while the City/County Association of Governments seeks volunteers to fill four vacancies on its 15-member Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee (C/CAG BPAC), due Nov. 14. Caltrain is taking applications for six of the nine seats of its Bicycle Advisory Committee, due Dec. 2.

The San Mateo County Transit District (SamTrans), which operates 76 bus routes, allows non-elected residents to serve on its Board of Directors, unique among the county’s major transportation agencies. Four “public members” are appointed by the five elected officials serving on the Board, who are themselves appointed by the City Selection Committee, composed of the Mayors of all 20 cities in San Mateo County. This committee of Mayors also appoints fellow city council members to the boards of Caltrain, the San Mateo County Transportation Authority (SMCTA), the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), and other county and regional agencies.

Read more…

43 Comments

More Carnage, More Data…and More Excuses from the City

Another crash on Market Street. Photo: John Rogers

Today’s crash on Market Street. Photo: John Rogers

Another cyclist was hit this morning on Market Street, between 7th and 8th, reported Streetsblog reader John Rogers. Details are still coming in. “Market is still a full-on traffic free-for-all, and the danger faced by the thousands of cyclists that ride the central street of our city everyday remains a travesty,” he wrote to Streetsblog in an email this afternoon.

Meanwhile, on Tuesday, Director Barbara Garcia of the San Francisco Department of Public Health reported on a recent analysis of trauma patients in the city.

From the Department Director’s statement:

People injured in traffic collisions comprise 50 percent of the patients seen at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Trauma Center–exceeding all other categories for cause of injury including falls, cuts/pierces, firearms, and assault

In other words, SF streets are literally a public health menace, like diabetes or guns. “This analysis puts into perspective the pervasiveness of traffic crashes in our society and the urgent need to invest in proven strategies to prevent crashes,” was the response of Nicole Ferrara, Executive Director of Walk San Francisco.

Read more…

27 Comments

Alameda Advocates Continue Push for Alternative to Posey Hell Tunnel

This post supported by

Brian McGuire and Marisa Wood took the afternoon shift counting peds and cyclists on the Alameda end of the Posey tube. Photo: Streetsblog.

Brian McGuire and Marisa Wood took the afternoon shift counting pedestrians and cyclists at the Alameda end of the Posey tube. Photo: Streetsblog.

Advocate-volunteers with BikeWalk Alameda took shifts today counting cyclists and pedestrians passing through the Posey Tube on their way between western Alameda and Oakland. The count will be used to help push for a pedestrian and bicycle drawbridge between Alameda and Jack London Square, across the Alameda estuary.

“That’s the big, long term goal,” said Brian McGuire, vice-president of BikeWalk Alameda, who was out counting  during an afternoon shift. “That’s the number-one priority.”

Read more…

133 Comments

A Note of Caution on Tech and Privatizing Transit

This post supported by

Is our new ride-hale tech tempting us to repeat past mistakes? Driveless cars has been a dream of road planners since the Interstate Highway System was first envisioned. Image source unknown.

Driverless cars have been anticipated by road planners since the Interstate Highway System was first envisioned. But is the near-realization of this dream tempting us to repeat past mistakes? Image source unknown.

At a recent SPUR meeting, an audience member asked why cities continue to invest billions in long-term projects, such as the Central Subway, when ride-hail services such as Juno, Lyft, and Uber Pool have rendered urban rail more or less obsolete. This sentiment is reflected in a recent piece in the Atlantic by former Los Angeles Times writer Alana Semuels, entitled: “The End of Public Transit?” She wrote about her experience riding Chariot instead of Muni:

Why should anyone use public services if the private sector can provide the same service more efficiently? On an individual level, after all, the private bus was much more pleasant and not much more expensive. On the government level, privatization could save money. Privatizing public bus services could save $5.7 billion a year, according to a paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research in March.

The piece brings up some interesting thoughts, which have been discussed in Streetsblog as well. It’s worth a read–certainly, transit agencies such as BART and SFMTA should be, and are, discussing collaboration with private transportation providers.

Read more…

118 Comments

SFMTA Super Speedy at Removing Safety Measures on Valencia

On Monday, SFMTrA installed safe hit posts on this corner to keep vehicles from sweeping across the corner, endangering cyclists. By the end of the week they were gone. Photo: Streetsblog

On Monday, SFMTrA installed safe-hit posts here to keep motorists from sweeping the corner and endangering cyclists. By the end of the week they were gone. Photo: Streetsblog

On Monday, Streetsblog joined the SFMTrA, a guerrilla-safety group that glues down safe-hit posts in trouble spots throughout the city, for a pre-dawn installion on Valencia between 17th and 14th. This afternoon, the posts were gone–and everything was back to its dangerous and dysfunctional normal.

Monday morning, trucks and cars were forced to slow and turn carefully to avoid hitting this post...which was promptly removed by SFMTA. Photo: Streetsblog.

Monday morning, trucks and cars were forced to slow and turn carefully to avoid hitting this post…which was promptly removed by SFMTA. Photo: Streetsblog.

Read more…

6 Comments

Fixing the Mess at Geneva-San Jose/Balboa Park

This post supported by

An aerial view of the study area. Photo: CTA

An aerial view of the study area. Photo: CTA

Last night, SFMTA held an open house at Lick Wilmerding High School to get community suggestions on what to do about the mess of tracks, ramps, road and pedestrian crossings on and around the intersection of Geneva and San Jose, adjacent to the Balboa Park BART and Muni stations.

From SFMTA’s project page:

The SFMTA is studying the area around the Geneva Avenue/San Jose Avenue intersection with the goal of developing short, medium and long-term improvements to transit access and safety for all users. Both Geneva and San Jose avenues are located on the City’s Vision Zero High Injury Network. This study will complement numerous projects underway in the immediate vicinity, including BART’s Station Modernization, the City’s Upper Yard Development and the City’s rehabilitation of the Geneva Car Barn. The study scope was developed in coordination with the Balboa Park Station Citizens Advisory Committee (BPSCAC) and District 11 Supervisor Avalos’ office.

This study will develop conceptual design improvements to address safety issues near the intersection. The analysis will include a focus on passenger access to Muni’s M Ocean View Line, which terminates within the Cameron Beach Yard on San Jose Avenue between Geneva and Niagara Avenues. This study will build upon past analyses and develop recommendations for improvements consistent with known plans.

Streetsblog readers will recall from an earlier post that BART is working concurrently to improve its part of the station (follow that link for more photos of the station and streets). For those not familiar with the area, the Geneva-San Jose intersection is part of a triangle of streets that also includes Ocean Ave. and is a crazy confluence of I-280’s on and off ramps, the K, the M, the J-Church, BART, and a gaggle of bus lines.
Read more…