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Today’s Headlines

  • New Divisadero Commercial District Designation Removes Parking Minimums for Businesses (Hoodline)
  • SFMTA Now Allows People to Protest Parking and Transit Citations Online (Muni Diaries)
  • Flywheel Taxi App Gets New CEO (SF Examiner); Uber’s PR Problems Are Chronic (SF Examiner)
  • Submission for Market St Prototyping Festival to Display Transit Info Through Lit-Up Totems (Curbed)
  • BART’s Oakland Airport Connector Opens Tomorrow (ON); TransForm: Hooray for 1% of BART Riders
  • Transbay BART Riders Suffer Major Delays Due to Equipment Problems (SFGate)
  • Developer Envisions Future Transit Village on Millbrae BART Station’s Parking Lot (Biz Times)
  • VTA’s BRT Proposal for El Camino Real Faces Concerns Over Traffic Impacts in Palo Alto (NBC)
  • People Behaving Badly: Burlingame Drivers Make Strange Excuses for Violations
  • Mountain View Parent Looks to Make Biking Safer for Kids at Two Schools (Peninsula)
  • Golden Gate Mendocino Ferry Gets $3.6M Interior and Water Jet Upgrades (Marin IJ)
  • Driver Who Struck Special-Needs Teens on San Mateo Sidewalk in Sept Arrested and Charged (SFGate)

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

Note: Streetsblog may be offline for maintenance this evening, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. PST.

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San Bruno Voters to Determine Future Downtown Growth with Measure N

The San Bruno Caltrain Station Area, as envisioned by the city’s Transit Corridors Plan with future retail and office development. Planners say the plan depends on the passage of Measure N. Image: Yes for San Bruno – Supporting Measure N

Last week, just two weeks before San Bruno voters choose whether or not to approve the Measure N ballot measure, city officials finally cleared the last legal hurdle for the measure, which would modify building height limits that voters set in 1977 with Ordinance 1284. That ordinance required a “town-hall type of hearing whereby experts, proponents, and opponents may be heard and questioned by voters,” so last Tuesday, a debate was held between San Bruno Mayor Jim Ruane and Peninsula Health Care District Board of Directors candidate Doug Radtke.

Ordinance 1284 limits all new building heights in San Bruno to 50 feet or three stories, caps residential zoning densities to those set forty years ago, and bans multi-story parking structures — unless a specific development project is approved by a majority of voters. If Measure N is approved, maximum building heights will increase to 90 feet (five stories) within one block of the new Caltrain station, to 70 feet along El Camino Real, to 65 feet along San Bruno and Huntington avenues, and to 55 feet along San Mateo Avenue. The measure would also repeal Ordinance 1284′s ban on multi-story parking structures, which will “help solve parking needs as the downtown becomes more vibrant and parking demand increases,” according to the city’s Measure N FAQ sheet.

Maximum building heights if Measure N is approved: 90 feet (yellow), 70 feet (blue), 65 feet (green), 55 feet (pink). Image: 2013 San Bruno Transit Corridors Plan

City planners say the higher building heights and residential densities specified in Measure N are critical to implement San Bruno’s Transit Corridors Plan, which aims to enable the development, over the next 20 years, of a higher-density residential and commercial area within walking distance of the city’s new Caltrain station. The station was reconstructed half a mile north of its isolated former location at Sylvan Avenue, opening in April as an elevated structure at the intersection of the city’s two main streets, San Mateo and San Bruno avenues.

“We expect full build-out to result in 4,000 additional jobs, 2,400 of which are a direct result of passing Measure N,” said Ruane, quoting a fiscal and economic impact report authored by consulting firm Economic & Planning Systems. “It would increase the population by 3,784 in the Transit Corridors Area, [with] Measure N accounting for 1,558.”

Read more…

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Embarcadero Enhancement Public Workshop (Folsom to AT&T Park)

From SFMTA:

The Project

The Embarcadero Enhancement Project is a planning exercise to develop a conceptual design for a protected bikeway along The Embarcadero to improve safety and comfort for all.

This Workshop

This public design workshop will focus on The Embarcadero’s southern segment (Folsom St. to AT&T Park.)

You’ll get to:

  • Take part in a hands-on design exercise to envision a protected bikeway on The Embarcadero;
  • Let us know about key issues and opportunities on the corridor, and;
  • Meet other people interested in transportation, The Embarcadero, urban design and San Francisco!

 

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Rincon Hill Community Meeting

From SFMTA:

Rincon Hill Community Meeting – Transit Alternatives

Join us at our upcoming Rincon Hill Community Meeting to find out what we learned from our recent transit study survey and to review and provide feedback on transit option proposals for the Rincon Hill community.

Meeting details:

  • Thursday, October 30, 2014 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
  • South Beach Harbor Community Room, Pier 40, by AT&T Park
  • Open House from 6-6:30pm
  • Brief presentation and Q&A from 6:30-7pm
  • Staff available until 7:30 p.m.
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Census Data Shows How Much Less Millennials and Gen-Xers Commute by Car

Change in share of Generation X Commuters (aged 25-54) driving to work, 2007 to 2013. Image: Brookings, from analysis of American Community Survey data

Change in share of Generation X Commuters (aged 25-54) driving to work, 2007 to 2013. Image: Brookings, from analysis of American Community Survey data

Cross-posted from Brookings’ The Avenue blog. This article is the second in a short series examining new Census data on transportation trends.

Nationally, most commuters are still revving up their cars to get to work every morning, but the picture is more complicated when you look across different age groups.

Based on the latest Census data from the 2013 American Community Survey, changes are underway for younger and older commuters alike, especially in the country’s largest metropolitan areas.* By and large, Millennials and Generation X are leading the charge toward a range of alternate modes, including public transportation and walking, while Baby Boomers continue to use their cars at even higher levels.

Indeed, while 82.4 percent of workers ages 16 to 24 — the youngest working Millennials — commute to work by car, that share has fallen by nearly 1.3 percentage points in large metros since 2007 and nearly 4 percentage points less than they did in 1983.

Young Millennials also represent the commuters who most frequently take public transportation (5.8 percent of them commute that way) and walk to work (6.6 percent). They’re not only ditching the car in traditional multimodal hubs like San Francisco but in several smaller metros as well. For example, Tucson ranked first nationally in its transit growth among these workers, seeing their share rise 5.5 percentage points since 2007. Meanwhile, more young workers are walking in other university-centric metros like Syracuse (+3.6 percent since 2007), New Haven (+2.4), and Austin (+1.7).

Still, driving dips aren’t limited to Millennials; Generation X commuters are shifting away from private vehicles in nearly equal numbers. Overall, workers aged 25 to 54 saw their driving rate fall by 0.9 percentage points between 2007 and 2013. That drop equates to roughly 750,000 drivers — about the total number of commuters in Milwaukee — switching to other modes. That might help explain the stalling amount of miles driven across the country.

Read more…

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Today’s Headlines

  • Sup. Scott Weiner Calls Hearing to Address Near-Term Muni Light Rail Fixes (SF Examiner)
  • Feds Give SFMTA $9M to Buy 12 New Muni Buses (KTVU)
  • Five Years After Google Buses Arrived In Noe Valley, Do Pros Outweigh Cons?
  • California PUC Hearing Will Reevaluate Regulations on Ride-Share Companies (Biz Times)
  • Taxi Companies Prepare for Slow Business This Winter (SF Examiner)
  • Anonymous Man in Safety Vest Directs Traffic at 3rd and Howard (SFist)
  • More on Collision that Ended High-Speed Chase Through Downtown SF (SF AppealDaily Journal)
  • Sunday Streets in Excelsior Welcomed by Some Neighbors (SFGate)
  • New Bay Bridge Already Corroding? (SFGate); People Behaving Badly: Tourists Drive GoCar on Bridge
  • GG Bridge District Strike Means Crowded Buses, Bridge Traffic (ABC, CBS)
  • Van Driver, Passenger Killed After Crashing into SamTrans Bus in San Mateo (ABC, KRON, SF Examiner)
  • Oakland Wins $3.2 Million Grant For Bike/Pedestrian Bridge at Lake Merritt (East Bay Express)

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

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Today’s Headlines

  • High-Speed Chase Ends in Three-Car Crash, Shooting at California and Battery (CBS, SF Examiner)
  • More on Tax Battle With Transbay Developers (SFGate, SF Appeal)
  • Civic Center BART to Get New Bike Station, Tripling Bike Capacity (KQED)
  • BART Increases Security Patrols After ISIS Threatens U.S. Subways (CBS)
  • GG Bridge District Transit, Ferry Workers Go on Strike Today (KQED, KTVU, Biz Times, SF Examiner)
  • Three-Foot Bicycle Buffer, Cycle Track, Bus Rack Legislation Explained by SF Examiner
  • SF Bicycle Coalition Explains How Prop L Would Hurt Bike Safety, Infrastructure, Funding
  • District Attorney Threatens Legal Action Against Sidecar, Lyft, Uber for Misrepresentation (KQED, NBC)
  • SF Apparel Firm Designs Jacket for Germophobic Transit Riders (CBS)
  • SPUR Wants Feedback on Ocean Beach Open Space Designs
  • Bay Bridge Demolition Remains on Schedule for 2018 (KTVU)
  • Burlingame Considers App-Based Parking Management for Downtown (SF Examiner)

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

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Tomorrow: Oakland Drops Protected Bike Lanes on Telegraph Avenue

Oakland’s recommended plan for Telegraph Avenue includes no bike lanes near the freeway ramps at 51st Street. Image: City of Oakland

Oakland has dropped protected bike lanes from its draft proposals to redesign Telegraph Avenue, and the buffered bike lanes that are included would disappear at the most dangerous section, throwing people on bikes into mixed traffic with motor vehicles. The city will hold two open houses this week where the public can weigh in on the draft plan [PDF], on Thursday evening and Saturday morning.

“New bikeways need to be ‘continuous’ and not force you to continually mix with cars and trucks that travel up to 35-40 mph,” wrote Dave Campbell of Bike East Bay in a blog post. “Buffered bike lanes improve the experience and make it safer for people who currently bicycle and want to ride on Telegraph Avenue, but buffered bike lanes between parked cars and moving cars do not attract new people to bicycling or encourage others to replace one or two car trips a week with a bicycle trip.”

Bike East Bay is urging people to attend the workshops and tell planners they want continuous protected bike lanes along Telegraph. They are also calling on the city to create a pilot project for protected bike lanes using temporary paint and planters materials, similar to the block-long demonstration the organization created on Bike to Work Day.

When Oakland city planners held initial workshops on Telegraph “Complete Streets” project in the spring, a few local business owners complained about losing on-street parking spots, but much of the public strongly supported a much calmer, safer street for walking and biking.

city survey of people who use Telegraph found that 60 percent wanted protected bike lanes on the street, including 53 percent of “frequent drivers.” The city initially included parking-protected bike lanes as an option for most of Telegraph, but that option is apparently being abandoned.

The latest plans [PDF] include improvements to pedestrian crossings, raised medians, bike boxes, and bus stops configured so the bike lane runs between a boarding island and the sidewalk. But the bike lanes disappear completely where they’re needed most, near the intersection at 51st Street where drivers heading to and from Highway 24 ramps cuts through the area.

At most intersections, like Telegraph and MacArthur seen here, bike lanes become protected briefly at bus stops but then throw riders between parked cars and moving cars. Image: City of Oakland

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SF Pedestrian Safety Advisory Committee Meeting

Agenda

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Forum: The Future of San Francisco Transportation

From Business Council on Climate Change:

The Future of San Francisco Transportation: What Can Green Teams do to Help?

Join colleagues from other San Francisco Green Teams on June 18th for a special event and webinar on sustainable transportation and commuting. Learn about cutting-edge ideas for building a stronger, greener transit system and discuss ways that you can get involved.

When
Wednesday, June 18th, 2014
9:00-10:00 AM (Presentation and Discussion)
10:00-10:30 AM (Networking Time)
Where
Attend in Person: Wells Fargo Learning and Events Center
333 Market St., Annex Building (2nd Floor, Clementine Room)
Attend via Webinar: Please join the Webinar at this link.

Speakers
Timothy Papandreou, Deputy Director, Strategic Planning and Policy, San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency

Timothy Papandreou directly oversees a team of 30 planning, engineering and policy staff tasked with implementing the SFMTA’s sustainable mobility goals through integrated, multi-modal (bicycle, walking, transit, car-sharing, parking and taxi) transportation plans, street design projects, and complete street projects. Previously Papandreou spent nearly nine years with the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, where he served as Transportation Planning Manager.

Employee Panel (Participants TBA)

Following Timothy Papandreou, an employee panel will share everyday experiences navigating different low carbon transit options in the Bay Area.

Details

  • Light breakfast will be provided.
  • Our room can accomodate 75 people; webinar participation is not restricted.
  • We encourage you to use public transportation to reach this event. The Wells Fargo learning center is adjacent to the Embarcadero Bart/Muni stop.
  • The event will begin promptly at 9:00 AM.

About the Business Council on Climate Change (BC3)

BC3 is a network of San Francisco companies dedicated to working together to secure a vibrant future for our city and our planet. Learn more at bc3sfbay.org. This event is part of a new initiative focused on empowering employees across local corporations to collaborate in advancing sustainability in San Francisco.