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  1.  

    Dark Soul

    Wait minute, Are they just designing the sidewalks just make it look better or they are just doing that jam traffic along with muni?

    Cause see Street Safety being degraded (Cars,Bikes,Transit) by the Widen Sudewalks instead of having safety overall balanced

  2.  

    Diane Feinstein

    But all my friends who are consultants get to hoover up the money. That’s the real purpose and method.

  3.  

    p_chazz

    As I said you need to build a consensus of people in favor of the change in order to make it happen. This includes more than just people who think as you do.

  4.  

    p_chazz

    Because cars are the status quo. You want change? It’s up to you to build a consensus in favor of the change.

  5.  

    p_chazz

    A plaza on 24th would screw up the route of the #48 bus.

  6.  

    Adam P Smith

    As a federal prisoner serving the last fews days of his sentence, I prefer that our resources be used to fill my bed, figuratively or otherwise, with predators – not the weary lounging.

    Meanwhile, when released on Monday…still have 32 tickets to answer from whence I slept in public near the central business district of Dallas (public usually meant at 3:30am, hiding behind an abandoned building) – one bill for such pending at the municipal level totals $7,210. I want my closely held religious beliefs respected, at least referencing old tickets and perpetual electronic dossiers, vide’licet background checks; you know, in the forgive AND forget ‘christian’ way.

  7.  

    Thomas Rogers

    I thought it was a little odd the Balboa planter has a stone rim around it, since that prevents (or at least limits) stormwater infiltration. However, the Richmond Review link notes: “The planters were raised slightly above ground level as an ADA issue so that people who are visually impaired will not walk into them and they can find the edge of the pedestrian walkway, according to DPW representatives.” I hadn’t heard that reasoning before- not sure if it’s a new precedent.

    Regardless, glad the SFFD hasn’t blocked these projects… yet, anyway.

  8.  

    Sanfordia113

    Mayor Ed Lee is much less of an asset to this city than 90% of its residents. He doesn’t deserve any “detail”. SFMTA and police should rabidly enforce any and all double parking violations or stopping in a crosswalk/bus zone.

  9.  

    Sanfordia113

    Until gangsters and homeless are extricated from Muni/SF, Muni will be the least preferred option of any transit modality. And even without them, subways need to be added before it becomes a viable alternative.

  10.  

    Sanfordia113

    Roundabouts are great from a traffic engineering and efficiency perspective, but they are real estate hogs. Also less friendly to pedestrians.

  11.  

    Karen Lynn Allen

    Walking through the outer Richmond a few weeks back I was pleasantly surprised how much nicer these changes made the neighborhood feel. The neighborhood now feels like a destination, with a center, vitality and character.

    I don’t expect the changes to Noe Valley to be as significant. While it will be nice to have the bus shelter on 24th near the post office not block nearly the entire sidewalk (as it does now) the bus bulb outs will mean that every time the 48 passes down 24th St traffic will come to a standstill. (Although, if this makes drivers give up on taking 24th as a cut through route to somewhere else, maybe this a good thing.) Fancier crosswalks are nice but I haven’t noticed on 24th and Castro that they make car drivers significantly more patient or careful, and I still see close calls on a regular basis when drivers make left hand turns as pedestrians are crossing. I find what has really improved the character, friendliness, and pedestrian experience of 24th street has been the parklets. (I especially like the one in front of Just for Fun.) I wish there were more of them.

    Can’t say I like the idea of a light at Church and 24th. If Noe Valley were a little more open to change, it might be interesting to experiment with shared space/uncontrolled intersections. It doesn’t have to be a roundabout like the video below, but the principles would be similar. These kinds of street designs tend to strengthen communities by putting the focus on human interaction rather than simply focusing on making car travel as convenient as possible.

    http://www.pps.org/reference/shared-space/
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vzDDMzq7d0

    A huge improvement for Noe Valley would be to have something in the Real Food dead space. What has it been, a decade now? Nutraceutical is an evil, evil company that supposedly produces health foods. Please avoid purchasing any of their products. (See: http://www.nutraceutical.com/products/ )

  12.  

    gohlkusmaximus

    Maybe someday the Geary subway will even get built. I’m not holding my breath, though, of course.

  13.  

    jd_x

    We’re just having a discussion here: I’m not the City trying to “sell” the idea. Sure, the city has to say things carefully, and I think they are. But on this website, when somebody tells me they are having pedestrian- or cyclist-friendly infrastructure “shoved down their throats”, that’s ridiculous because of how often it goes the other way.

  14.  

    Jamison Wieser

    Along Church Street no, but there’s already one bulbout on the Northeast corner of 24th. The Southeast corner could be extended to create a new boarding waiting and boarding area for eastbound 48 busses while shortening the crossing for pedestrians.

    Since the SFMTA is going to be tearing up the intersection to signalize and build new boarding platforms, it’s an opportunity to make other improvements to the intersection. And since corner extensions are already part of the program level TEP toolkit they can be added without the need for a new environmental study or report.

  15.  

    Jamison Wieser

    Your premise is that signalizing the intersection with transit priority and far side boarding will not speed up the J-Church is that it’s already stopping.

    At least going into the Transit Effectiveness Project one of the problems with non-signalized intersections was the multiple stops a train has to make waiting for cars stopped ahead. Having to repeatedly start and stop was creating delays and putting wear and tear on the vehicles.

    Has something changed? Does every J pull up directly to the stop without ever having a car stopped ahead of it?

    But if that’s not the case and transit priority signaling won’t work, then the SFMTA should just toss out the existing TEP and start over.

  16.  

    Michael Smith

    And with respect to 2), the proposed street design for that intersection, there are unfortunately no plans for bulb outs there.

  17.  

    Guest

    With respect to 2), the proposed street design for that intersection, there are no plans for bulb outs there because there is no space for them.

  18.  

    Michael Smith

    Note: my point is that replacing a stop sign with a traffic signal at a bus/streetcar stop does NOT speed up transit. The vehicles are already stopping to pickup or alight passengers because that is a very heavily used stop. Therefore having a green light does NOT speed up transit since the transit vehicles are going to stop at the intersection anyways.

    Plus Transit Preferential Signaling (TPS) doesn’t even mean that the transit vehicle always gets a green light. It simply means that in certain cases the green light will be extended. For example, if TPS is to extend a green light by up to 10 seconds but the vehicle is 12 seconds from the intersection it will still get a red light and have to stop at the light, and then again at the transit stop, actually slowing down transit. Another issue is that if a bus with TPS is coming the other direction on 24th then the streetcar wouldn’t get priority. In this situation, where there is currently a stop sign, putting in a TPS signal can only hurt.

    Another issue is that Muni has a very bad track record in implementing TSP. Check out how often the streetcars stop on the F-line on the Embarcadero and the T on Third St. They should be looking at fixing those problems first.

    Plus look at the cost. We are likely talking about $400k project to put in a signal and move the stops. That money could be far more effectively spent implementing TPS at intersections that already have signals.

    TSP signals are an improvement over non-TPS signals and should be implemented citywide where there are currently non-TSP signals. But it is a fallacy to say they are better than stop signs.

  19.  

    RoyTT

    To be fair, the photo shows Lee leaving the car but gives no indication that any vehicle was “parked”. A snapshot doesn’t reveal duration. There are various circumstances where a vehicle stops somewhere momentarily to let someone out or in, but is never parked. Cabs do that all the time, for instance, as do valet parkers.

    Isn’t there also a security issue here? Any leader like the president or a governor or mayor will typically have a security detail tasked with his safety. That is easier to maintain if the leader is delivered directly to and from his destination. We’ve already had one mayor assassinated, not to mention a couple of Presidents.

    I suspect that Obama’s motorcade routinely breaks all kinds of traffic rules but don’t we make a special allowance for that?

    None of this is to say we should grant immunity from the regulations for political executives. But at the margin, can we not accept the idea that some people get chauffeured to their destination for sound reasons?

  20.  

    RoyTT

    But it matters how you position it. If you can show a community how removing some parking will reduce pollution, congestion, and accidents while providing very specific local benefits, there’s a good chance you can convince many of them.

    If instead you position it as “moving the city away from prioritizing cars”, then people will likely be hostile to that. People want to hear this is not just about deliberately inconveniencing them as part of a city-wide ideology. Rather they want to hear that you’re actually thinking hard about improving their lives in that one very specific location.

    You can think this is ultimately about making it harder for people to drive. Just don’t say it if you want to win hearts and minds.

  21.  

    murphstahoe

    Democracy involves “elections”. The only candidate in the ” election ” at that time who supported the project won easily. The office holder at that time ran for Mayor and finished 10th.

    If these bulbouts eliminate parking I predict the cast of characters will show up to complain and the current office holder will thank them for their opinion but it will not impact the changes. And he will cruise to re-election.

  22.  

    vcs

    Great. The current configuration is horribly dangerous because the transit island disabled ramp blocks drivers’ view of the intersection.

  23.  

    jd_x

    What’s more unfathomable is that, even though ridership has nearly doubled, the Caltrain experience remains essentially completely unchanged since the introduction of the bullets. Service is still not frequent enough, ammenities poor (no wi-fi, nasty stinky bathrooms, janky trains, stations like 22nd St which is one of the most used but still doesn’t have basic digital signs or sufficient stairways, etc.).

  24.  

    jd_x

    As somebody who wants to see my city move away from prioritizing cars over all else, I get cars shoved down my throat (figuratively speaking, thought their pollution literally gets shoved down my throat) all the time. Why is that okay but motorists having to get some things “shoved down their throat” not okay?

  25.  

    jd_x

    I hear ya, but if true, this seems silly to take away from the pedestrian experience when just about every other intersection on Church between 30th and 22nd has much fewer pedestrians yet stop signs the whole way. Why not signalize some of those intersections and leave the pedestrians with the one intersection with the heaviest foot traffic? Traffic lights kill the “urban village” feel and make it feel car-centric.

    I still don’t know why we can’t just ban cars on at least one block of 24th St and turn the street into a plaza …

  26.  

    Jamison Wieser

    One of the reasons to install a signal is to speed up transit service. When a train or bus approaches, the signal can hold a green until the vehicle reaches the platform and a lot of the time-travel reduction projects depend on that working.

    Speeding up Muni will mean giving Muni vehicles priority and that will sometimes come at the expense of the pedestrian experience, but:

    1) I look at more reliable transit service as part of the pedestrian experience (where waiting for a walk signal is worth it if there’s a faster Muni ride at the other end)

    2) it will all depends on the design itself and what the tradeoffs are (signals with corner bulbouts would mean waiting for a walk signal, but having a shorter distance to cross and more sidewalk space at the corners) and that project should be coming up next year.

  27.  

    Michael Smith

    Ack, when is the MTA going to learn that where there is a streetcar or bus stop that a traffic signal doesn’t speed up transit. It only degrades the pedestrian environment.

  28.  

    Jamison Wieser

    In addition to the decorative crosswalks, 24th & Church will be signalized with new J-Church boarding platforms on the far side of the intersection (after the light) as part of the top Transit Effectiveness Project improvements to be implemented in the next couple years.

    That could be why the SFMTA isn’t doing any more than patterned crosswalk at this point.

  29.  

    p_chazz

    This is a nice companion project to the improvements on Castro between 19th and Market.

    The 24th St Park being developed is far superior to the earlier proposal to interrupt the street grid by closing a block of Noe to automobile traffic. People don’t like things they don’t want shoved down their throats. That’s why they turned out in such numbers to oppose it. It’s called democracy, for those of you who may be unfamiliar with the concept.

  30.  

    alberto rossi

    that 7 minute ride on BART is a real killer

  31.  

    murphstahoe

    I read Caltrain’s Agenda for the JPB meeting. In May, Caltrain carried 57,000+ passengers per weekday, a number I would have considered unfathomable when I started riding in 1998 (~23,000 per day). This despite the private shuttles carrying thousands of potential passengers on the same general routing. The traffic on US-101 is horrible and probably drives the ridership some, but the traffic was horrible in 2000 and the ridership was less than half the current number.

  32.  

    murphstahoe

    He lives in Glen Park and works at Civic Center. Not exactly an easy transit journey. Cut him a break.

  33.  

    timsmith

    The lack of a proper sidewalk violates the city’s own policies, including those laid out in the Better Streets Plan. Holding the city’s feet to the fire to uphold the most basic of safety amenities for the pedestrians is a worthy cause.

  34.  

    Tony

    Another car is parked in the red zone at the stop sign. Part of the mayor’s entourage?

  35.  

    Miles Bader

    Who pays for that police chauffeur though…?

  36.  

    mike_napolis_beard

    We all know where this is going, right? Photographs of the Mayor will be strongly discouraged and the behavior will continue unabated.

  37.  

    stitch94133

    Maybe if Rose Pak and Willie Brown can get contracts worth millions to repair crosswalks Ed Lee will finally pay attention.

  38.  

    gneiss

    A target for what? Michael Bloomberg took the subway to work while he was mayor for the city of New York. I hardly think that Ed Lee is more of a target for assassination (I assume that’s what your’e talking about) while picking up his morning bun at a bakery.

    A public rally where he’s expected? Maybe there. But, if he’s not acting in his official capacity as ‘mayor’ there’s no reason he should act like any other private citizen and find a parking space first before walking to place his order.

  39.  

    charger43

    A legal parking spot? Come on, he’s the Mayor of SF. Doesn’t that make him a possible target? Let him park as close to where he is as possible. People need to get over themselves.

  40.  

    Michael Smith

    Just a reminder, the hybrid proposal isn’t even BRT. For real BRT, and significant travel times reductions, you will have to look at how other cities do things.

  41.  

    voltairesmistress

    So true! I ride public transit just a handful of times per month (biking often or driving sometimes), yet each transit ride gives me lots to think about. The mayor would do well to ride his bike and take muni and Bart to work a couple of times a week. I think that would do more than anything to change his disdain for the citizens who get around without cars. So far, Mayor Lee has been nothing but an empty suit, mouthing platitudes about safety while continuing business as usual. Truly an unthinking tool of a man.

  42.  

    Antoine Quentin Mahan

    THE DEVIL IS TRULY BUSY AND I’M SICK AND TIRED OF HIS MESS TODAY IN THIS CITY…
    MY CONVERTIBLE WAS TOWED TODAY WHILE I WAS IN THE MOVIES IT COST ME $483.00 TO GET IT OUT THEN WHEN I LOOKED AT THE 2 TICKETS THEY GAVE ME, ONE WAS FOR THE METER AND THE OTHER ONE WAS FOR FALSE ALLEGATIONS OF HAVING A FALSE DISABLED PLACARD.
    WHEN YOU THINK THINGS IS GOING OKAY, IT’S TRULY A SET BACK FOR COME BACK FOR A COME UP FOR SOMETHING WAY BIGGER AND BETTER THAN WHAT THE SITUATION IS.
    YEAH I’M UPSET AND IT ALMOST MESSED UP THE REST OF MY DAY, I MANAGED TO GET MY CAR OUT THOUGH AND FILE FOR A HEARING. ONE TICKET COST $880.00 AND THE OTHER WAS $64.00 THAT THEY PLACED ON MY CAR…
    A TEST I SENSED IN THE AIR AND I MUST SAY THAT I’M A FIRM BELIEVER IN GOD AND THIS TOO SHALL PASS AND I’LL GET MY MONEY BACK.

    PRAY FOR ME PLEASE… BE BLESSED FOR THE 4TH WKD. AHEAD AND BE SAFE AS WELL….

  43.  

    Jame

    Only peons use crosswalks and take muni!

  44.  

    Osowoofy

    thanks for the link….i’m really interested in this project.

  45.  

    Chris J.

    Kudos to Supervisor Wiener and others like him. There’s no better foundation to understanding transportation issues like Muni than to experience it from the public’s perspective on a regular basis.

  46.  

    runn3r85

    You actually have to build the damn thing. SF talks and talks and talks and nothing gets done. In the meantime, lots of taxpayer money is spent for studies and all we get are these great Microsoft word charts.

  47.  

    Dr. Maysure

    It’s called decelerating. This number is not alarming at all and seems fairly standard for a freeway offramp.

  48.  

    Dr. Maysure

    This. Biking is the fastest way to get around SF, but you’re sucking down loads of fumes due to all the traffic.

  49.  

    Dr. Maysure

    Ugh, having lived in SF for 3 years I’ve come to realize that this is the typical attitude of people who live in this city and control its politics.

    Cars = evil, so get rid of traffic lanes and parking at all cost. As a result, this city has become the most difficult in the country to get around. The public transit system here is a joke, falling well short of even the systems I’ve used while traveling in cities in poor, developing countries. By “falling well short”, I mean that it’s slower, less adherent to schedule, less reliable, less frequent, often dirtier, less safe, and full of more crazy people. That’s right – countries with rampant corruption, minimal rule of law, and most of the population living on <$2 a day still somehow manage to build a far better public transit system than SF. Sad but true.

    There was once supposed to be a freeway system throughout the city. This would have helped the situation, but cars are evil, so it didn't happen. Embarcadero Freeway falls down? Don't rebuild it. Cars are evil. Why not remove a lane on Cesar Chavez? Cars are evil, so it's done. Tear down the northern section of 280? Sure, let's get more of those evil cars out of the city? Any road where cars can travel faster than 20mph through the city is under constant attack, so of course this tiny spur of San Jose is a natural target. Who cares if have to wait in traffic another half hour every day? Just take public transit! It'll get you 20 miles to work in only 2.5 hours each way! Sleeping, spending time with your family, and being on time for work are overrated anyway.

    Enough of this madness. Fix public transit first, then you can talk about taking lanes out of major thoroughfares. Until then, let us be.

  50.  

    Justin

    I would have rather seen alternative 3 throughout most of the Geary BRT and including the Masonic tunnels and Fillmore overpass and alternative 2 on Geary/Starr King way past Laguna St heading east, in the westbound direction alternative 2 on Geary ending and the transition to alternative 3 at Geary and Gough St or Geary and Laguna St. I just hope that we’re building REAL genuine Bus Rapid Transit otherwise the real benefits of it won’t genuinely be seen and realized