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  1.  

    Glen's Glen Canyon

    They don’t have a tv in that taqueria. Your move, Lee!

  2.  

    Lee Ross

    Amazing!! I have received MORE comments re this Post than ANY other I have put out.. I will stipulate that Mayor Lee is boring, a hack politician,a career bureaucrat foisted onto San Francisco by Gavin Newsom with NO imagination or strategic vision. Still,all the serious thoughtful reaction to his car being parked at a Muni stop boggles my mind.

  3.  

    Glen's Glen Canyon

    So if I pay the mayor two dollars, can he give me a ride?

    Or, can I just sneak into the backseat and pretend like I paid?

  4.  

    murphstahoe

    The story is – the Mayor could care less about inconveniences of “regular people”, so much so that he can’t be bothered to make sure his lackeys park correctly.

    If he can’t be bothered to do that, how can we expect him to deal with bigger issues that require real thought.

  5.  

    Dark Soul

    New York City is San Francisco?

  6.  

    Dark Soul

    Did Valdimir Putin approve your message?

  7.  

    justageek

    Let me address your points:

    1) The fact that the city has been planning to do this for a while doesn’t make it a good idea. It just means the city has been planning to do it for a while. As for the bike lane in one direction vs. the other, I think the big difference is that SB flows well because it just flows onto the highway, so having fewer lanes works out OK. But NB ends in a stoplight, so it backs up badly with only two lanes. Anyway how many people are using the bike lane? And please don’t tell me people are going to start biking if you slow the traffic on San Jose Ave down enough; that’s preposterous.

    2) I think the desires of the residents needs to be balanced against the needs of the drivers. The extra traffic congestion that this lane reduction is causing is substantial. That translates into wasted time of thousands of people every day. Which brings me to…

    3) Anyone who moved in to to this area less than 50 years ago knew what they were getting into and doesn’t seem entitled, in my view, to complain about the road configuration. It’s like people who move in next to an airport and then complain about the airplane noise. As for the people who actually have been living here more than 50 years, I think it would be reasonable for the city to compensate them somehow (should have happened back then if it didn’t). I’d strongly favor the city spending money to put up a sound wall or whatever. But inconveniencing thousands of other people seems like totally the wrong solution to the neighbors’ concerns.

    BTW I didn’t understand your point about the J. The J is grade separated along San Jose Ave, and isn’t affected by the number of car lanes.

  8.  

    davistrain

    This is a common problem all over the world, but one would think the mayor of a supposedly liberal city would not act like a Russian commissar or third-world despot.

  9.  

    Dark Soul

    No Support on Ballet

    What we need is
    Reliable Muni
    Safety

    not buffering lines

  10.  

    jamiewhitaker

    I think a lot of folks care. Actions are louder than words, and the words about wanting to improve MUNI seem like pure bullshit when Sunday meter revenues get killed off and the Mayor’s car illegally parked in MUNI bus stops to slow that bus line down for transit riders. It matters a lot.

  11.  

    jamiewhitaker

    When will we get a mayor that takes transit? Transit worked for the billionaire mayor of New York City, Michael Bloomberg. Why not SF’s Mayor?

  12.  

    NoeValleyJim

    12 bags??? How big is your family? I feed the whole family for a week on the four bags I carry on a cargo bike home from Costco.

    If you plan ahead, you can reserve a car on the weekends on car sharing services. I know because I have done it.

    The US and SF are in for major changes in our lifetimes: the oil is going to run out and we can’t keep polluting the atmosphere with green house gases the way we have been. Luckily San Francisco is already moving in the right direction. People who are unwilling to adapt to changing circumstances are going to see their standard of living go way down.

  13.  

    NoeValleyJim

    Why do you have to ride over Twin Peaks? The only reason to go over Twin Peaks is to go to Twin Peaks, there are many routes around it.

    An electric bicycle will get you anywhere: I lived 15 years with no car in San Francisco and had no real problems. When I really needed one, I used a carshare.

    With the money you save by not owning a car, you can afford to live closer to work to boot.

  14.  

    vcs

    Yep, my favorite secret Muni stop. I suspect MTA doesn’t want to promote it because it’s not accessible.

  15.  

    94103er

    So sorry you think it’s a terrible idea. I suppose you deserve a response (unlike cranky troll @Rlrcoaster who really just needs to get on with his life) so I’ll engage:

    1) It’s not a terrible idea. It’s a huge oversight decades in the making that’s finally getting addressed. If you follow a link in the body of the article you’ll read about how the city’s been about to make this change for at least 4 years now. How does it make sense for a road to have a bike lane in one direction but not the other?

    2) If there are backups on 280 that’s better than 3 lanes of cars ramming through a neighborhood at 60+ MPH and maybe, possibly, the residents of Sunnyside and Mission Terrace are getting some relief from the noise of 280 being right there with no sound wall.

    3) There ARE houses along the cut. So what if the front doors don’t face it? You clearly don’t even notice the homes directly to the south of you as you exit onto San Jose Ave–that section of the Mission/Bernal no-man’s-land doesn’t even really have a recognizable name, it’s been neglected so long. It appears to be called College Terrace these days: https://goo.gl/maps/O2EuO

    How would you feel if you were a longtime resident and 50 years ago the city rammed a freeway and a freeway extension through your neighborhood and said ‘good luck’ and never put up a sound wall, sound-absorbing landscaping, *anything*??? Or if you were a J rider and you once had a pretty dignified transit-priority corridor and one day it was just given over to fast-moving private-car traffic?

  16.  

    Fran Taylor

    Can’t he at least pay a dollar a day per stop?

  17.  

    Evan

    “Mayor Lee has blocked Public Transit more than once.”

  18.  

    Evan

    I care. One of my biggest pet peeves is the inconsiderate drivers who block a bus, causing the bus to stop in a lane of traffic. It’s bad for the bus riders AND it’s bad for traffic. It’s illegal for a reason. And the idea that the mayor’s office thinks they can flout that law with no penalty is just a sign of how they perceive themselves as above the law.

  19.  

    Guest

    That lousy car hides the wealth of the Mayor who can afford $100,000 diamond rings for his wife for no particular occasion just to promote the egoism of a typical idiot politician.

  20.  

    Lee Ross

    Again, all the overheated rhetoric aside, my main and only point here is that This Is A NonStory. I liken it to all the Nonsense tossed toward Mayor Quan in Oakland because, perish the thought, she used her Smartphone while driving. By the way I am not a fan of Ed Lee. I think he’s boring and a political hack of the worst order. But, let’s get after The Mayor for some real ‘stuff’; like being in the hip pocket of PG&E, gutting the Clean Energy program and only paying lip service to the bicycle community.

  21.  

    Chris J.

    Who cares?

    I do. I care. Little things like this matter in life. I also think that city leaders should lead by example and strive to be model citizens. When city leaders flout the law, it undercuts campaigns asking citizens to do the same (e.g. “Be Nice, Look Twice”).

  22.  

    Sprague

    The challenges and barriers that many wheelchair users are confronted with on a daily basis often go far beyond inconveniences. Each individual obstruction (like a car blocking the sidewalk, forcing one to go out into the street, or a car blocking a bus stop) adds up, discouraging mobility. And if a public bus can not access the curb, other riders with mobility impairments may also have their mobility/ability to access the bus restricted. On one level, this article may appear to cover a minor infraction but it is important to call the mayor out for such an infraction. Blocking a Muni bus stop is a violation of the law and if the mayor appears to get away with it then why shouldn’t you or I?

  23.  

    Jim

    I wonder how often DPT cites and/or tows government vehicles. In NYC, even the FBI are not immune from being towed by the NYPD (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/24/nyregion/in-new-york-no-standing-zones-not-even-the-fbi-is-exempt.html).

    Would be great if traffic enforcement was put back under the jurisdiction of SFPD, so traffic laws might actually get enforced. Parking and traffic management and direction chould be under the sole jurisdiction of MTA. I find that it is a great waste of money when I see SFPD officers stand at a construction site or traffic accident all day just to direct traffic. Those officers tend not to issue traffic tickets while on traffic duty, so why not completely have DPT personnel stand there instead.

  24.  

    Timsmith

    My thought is that we haven’t had a mayor who has truly prioritized transit since Sunny Jim Rolfe, and we’re paying the price. Transit is news, and it’s even more important than the PG&E situation (which also matters). Stories like this (which Aaron probably cranked out in an hour or two) can gradually bring attention to this shortcoming and help to change it.

  25.  

    94103er

    I would bet Lee doesn’t even know where the J stop is. A good portion of residents don’t. The SFMTA clearly doesn’t want you to know where it is. Every time I see it I wonder if I’m just asleep and having a dystopian nightmare.

  26.  

    Nicholas Littlejohn

    A real electric like a Leaf would have been far cooler!

  27.  

    Prinzrob

    BART is planning on redeveloping the Downtown Berkeley station plaza, and my suggestion to them was to use the opportunity to build a permanent bike parking facility using space they own and control, similar to the bike parking facilities in DC, Chicago and Long Beach.

    Regardless, I get the sense that BART and the City of Berkeley are seriously committed to keeping the Bike Station downtown, even if not in the same location. Additional bike parking rooms are being opened this year at the MacArthur and 19th Street stations, so if anything BART is expanding, not reducing the amount of secure bike parking available.

  28.  

    Zmapper

    Are agency vehicles used for driver reliefs technically allowed to park in bus stops?

  29.  

    Lee Ross

    The point is that This is non story. Look at the recent Chron piece re The Mayor’s tight relations with PG&E. Now that is NEWS! By the way I do not own a car and have used my bike and public transit since the 70′s. Your thoughts?

  30.  

    Timsmith

    You may not care about the Mayor’s attitude towards transit riders. Others do. If that bothers you, feel free to spend your time elsewhere.

  31.  

    Justin

    Understood

  32.  

    Prinzrob

    Isn’t the point of having a driver so that you don’t have to mess around with that whole parking thing? When I used to work as a chauffeur (not kidding) I would just find a legal spot within 5 minutes of the drop-off (not difficult) or circle around until I did or was called back.

    Also, the Mayor uses an SFPD Officer as a driver? That must be crazy expensive!

  33.  

    blue

    I don’t think so. The only reason for congestion is freeway expansion is always behind the congestion. Have effective public transportation in suburban is not realistic. You are only wasting resource on that.

  34.  

    Blue

    I agree! This HOV thing is totally wrong. You cannot charge people twice for using the same road. If singles have to pay for HOV, then they should have tax refund for HOV.

  35.  

    Lee Ross

    Who cares? This is just a nonsense piece of reporting that is better suited for some bored blogger. And it is the high point of snarkiness to intone that someone in a wheelchair might have been inconvenienced. Talk about piling on. I thought Streetsblog has more important news to cover. Maybe the Mayor was watching Mexico in the World Cup at La Corneta Taqueria. Let’s give him an Ole!! for that.

  36.  

    sebra leaves

    I believe the bond measure is going to be on the ballot.

  37.  

    Justin

    I don’t get how the mayor’s Chevrolet Volt is part of the Muni system. SMH

  38.  

    Easy

    This stretch of Kansas St is part of SF Bike Route 123, which connects the 17th St bike lanes to the 8th St and Division/Townsend St bike lanes, yet it only has sharrows. They’re pretty ineffective as well – cars and UPS trucks will try pass you, and then cut you off when the face oncoming traffic. This is a rare opportunity to put in a bidirectional curb-separated bike lane at the same time as other construction! They should also take a bite out of the south-west corner of the block to make a Dutch-style roundabout.

  39.  

    twinpeaks_sf

    Don’t even.

  40.  

    njudah

    the SFMTA is clueless. they wil toss in the dumpster all the existing maps when they could in fact SELL THEM ON EBAY and make some cash. How do I know this? During the last revision in 2009 I got a shit-ton of them thanks to Mr. Judson True, who was a rockin’ spokesman for Muni. I framed one and kept the rest and all along the way home I had Muni employees and Owner/Ridres BEGGING ME to buy one off of me.

    Watch how fast they toss the old ones into the burner. Watch. Duh.

  41.  

    Andy Chow

    When you think about it, his car is owned by the city (see the CA exempt license plate), so are Muni buses. So in a way his car is a part of the Muni system, similar to the civilian appearance police car fleet for the plain clothes officers.

  42.  

    Thomas Rogers

    Clearly, he thinks he’s especial- the power has gone to his cabeza!

  43.  

    Mario Tanev

    Unfortunately San Francisco has no visionary politicians, mayors in particular.

    Mayors being seen on public transit has been common in New York, London, etc. London has made enormous strides in its public transit in the last decade. San Francisco hasn’t. A simple litmus test like this seems to be pretty good at correlating with actual achievements in transportation.

    Mayor Lee doesn’t even realize that history won’t view him positively in this regard. Or he doesn’t care.

  44.  

    Jeffrey Baker

    This place is literally half a block from a BART station and one block from a J-Church stop.

  45.  

    Mario Tanev

    Mayor Lee lives in Glen Park. Does he really have to drive to what’s essentially Downtown Glen Park (which is downhill from everywhere else)? While a lot of people drive far distances, most people in SF walk at least to their neighborhood businesses.

  46.  

    MrEricSir

    Why isn’t Lee required to take Muni, again?

  47.  

    mike_napolis_beard

    Yeah yeah … But won’t someone please think of the car drivers? Restore imbalance ’14!

  48.  

    Justin

    you mean the other way round, if it becomes a ballot measure

  49.  

    voltairesmistress

    Mayor Lee directed or allowed his driver to unload and park in a bus zone. While the mayor and pals ate tacos. I believe the next, better mayor has his or her first campaign issue. “Need transit? Get this man out of the way.” I invite fellow readers to come up with far better slogans, as this was but a first shot.

  50.  

    Miles Bader

    There certainly should be a rule that members of the administration must use public transport or walking/bicycling for normal work travel…