Campaign Enlists Comedians to Curb Reckless Teen Driving

The Ad Council has some new material in its campaign aimed at teenage drivers. In these spots, a comedic actor (Fred Willard in the ad above) in the backseat of a car with three teens cajoles or threatens the driver into slowing down or minding the road. The gist of the campaign, corresponding with the title of its web site, is "speak up or else" — a name perhaps more suited to hard-hitting PSAs from overseas.

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A Reality Check for the DA’s New Traffic Safety Campaign

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For a district attorney who wants to save lives on the streets, using data to target the most dangerous traffic behaviors should be a no-brainer. But the new traffic safety ad campaign announced today by San Francisco DA George Gascón seems to use little application of crash data collected by his own former police department. The three versions of the ad, which […]

SFPD Captain Justifies Bike Crackdown By Misconstruing “Focus on the Five”

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SFPD Park Station Captain John Sanford is misconstruing the premise of his department’s “Focus on the Five” campaign to justify diverting precious traffic enforcement resources for his own campaign: getting people on bikes to always stop at stop signs, once and for all. Here’s a refresher on Focus on the Five, for those, like Sanford, who need it… […]

City-Approved Flyers Shame Pedestrians on Mission Sidewalks

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Flyers warning people not to walk across the street while looking at their phones, or against traffic signals, were recently posted on corners along Mission Street in the Mission District. The flyers, which sport the official “Vision Zero SF” logo, feature messages like, “Attention pedestrian: Look up from your phone. Your text can wait.” Another reads (in Spanish), “Careful. Stop. Crossing […]