Bus vs. Rail: Transit’s Quiet Culture Clash?

The question of running buses or building rail has preoccupied transit
planners in many an American town, with Maryland’s Montgomery County
being the latest locality to choose between trains and bus rapid transit (BRT), which tends to be the less expensive option.

brt_bogota_poster.jpgBogota’s Transmilenio BRT has won praise for its roomy coaches and well-designed stations. (Photo: Streetfilms)

But
another, far thornier aspect of the bus versus rail debate has made its
way into the public dialogue, giving fodder to transit-minded bloggers
from Matt Yglesias to Atrios: Is there a cultural bias against buses? The issue, fraught with social equity implications, made its way into a debate on conservatives and transit held today by Transportation for America.

The debate focused largely on the themes of the book Moving Minds, in which co-authors Bill Lind and the late Paul Weyrich aim to convert
their fellow conservatives into transit advocates. But Lind is also an
unabashed critic of buses, which he believes are unappealing to average
American travelers and impede the prospects for transit expansion.

"Most
Americans like transit but don’t like riding buses," Lind said today,
adding that "if you give them a bus, they drive," but rail would be a
more preferable mode than the auto.

Sam Staley,
the Reason Foundation director enlisted as the conservative transit
skeptic for the debate, was put in the unlikely position of defending
well-designed BRT’s ability to serve communities.

Depicting
buses as second fiddles to rail is "underestimating the importance of
the quality of service
provided," Staley said. Where rail is treated as superior, he added,
often it is "doing a better job of getting point to point, and doing it
faster,
than a bus," but well-funded bus systems "are doing a good job at
competing."

For a more in-depth look at the bus-rail dichotomy, check out the Transportation Research Board’s recent paper on how the choice affects local transit goals.

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