SPUR Lunchtime Forum: A new plan for North San Jose

"With a population of 1.7 million, San Jose is now the region’s largest city and has embarked on a series of major plans for long-term growth. Planners propose to remake North San Jose’s suburban-style business district into a walkable, dense corridor around the existing light rail line. Once built, this area will include nearly 68 million square-feet of office space (an increase from today’s 40 million). This is one of the Bay Area’s best examples of how to retrofit suburbia with an eye on future-growth. With Executive Assistant Director for Redevelopment John Weiss and Chief Development Officer Paul Krutko."

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