Lombard Street Redesign Open House

From SF Planning:

Please join the Office of Economic and Workforce Development, Supervisor Mark Farrell’s Office, the San Francisco Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the Transit Authority, and the Planning Department for the first public open house on Invest in Neighborhoods for the Lombard Street Corridor. Staff from these city agencies will discuss transportation improvements, upcoming City projects, and opportunities to shape the future of the Corridor.

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