Today’s Headlines

  • SF Reverend: Taking the Bus to Church “Unrealistic” (Is Paying for Parking Realistic?) (SF Examiner)
  • SF Chronicle Mistakes Existing Transit-Only Lanes for “Heavily-Used Driving Lanes”
  • “Street Fight” Author Jason Henderson on Equity Issues at the National Bike Summit (SFBG)
  • For Some San Franciscans, Their Bicycle is a Reflection of Their Personality (Bold Italic)
  • SFSU Students Push for Discounted Student Muni Pass Deal With SFMTA (Foghorn)
  • App Tells Car Owners When Street Sweeping is Coming (SFGate); SF Mag: Is That Just Coddling?
  • Berkeley Considers Extending Parking Meter Hours to 8 P.M. (Business Times Hates it)
  • Alameda Ferry Service to SF to “Basically Double” (Alamedan)
  • Caltrain Delayed After Squirrel-Caused Power Outage Puts Dispatch Network on the Fritz (CBS)
  • TJPA/SFMTA Chair Tom Nolan: HSR Funds Crucial for Caltrain Electrification (SF Examiner)
  • A Bay Area Transit Map Drawn to Reflect Relative Commute Times (Atlantic Cities)
  • Mercury Roadshow Explains the CVC on Where Drivers May Enter a Bike Lane

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

  • murphstahoe

    One Sunday I took my son on the 1 California. At this time he was 2 years old, walking but not very stable for a bus line going up and down the hills. The bus was pretty crowded, I sort of nervously took a seat in the front and sat my son in my lap. The bus continued to fill as we picked up elderly worshippers, and I fidgeted and finally an elderly woman yelled at me that the seats were reserved for the elderly and disabled. I admittedly was upset about the whole situation and did not handle it well, saying “for the purposes of this discussion, a child who can barely walk is disabled! He can’t stand or he’ll fall, and I can’t hold him or I’ll fall.

    Eventually another woman offered to hold my son who enjoyed the attention and I apologized to the first woman for being defensive.

    Upshot – there are so many people taking MUNI to Church it’s ridiculous.

  • Is letting elderly churchgoers get behind the wheel of a car “realistic”?

  • voltairesmistress

    The Examiner article about church goers needing their cars has some interesting statistics, even if anecdotal: that about 2/3s of parishioners drive to church, that the majority of parishioners are older, and that in at least one congregation 70% come from outside the city. The picture this presents is of older adults leaving behind city life but not their long-established church communities in the city.

    Every study shows that attending religious services is a great way for older folks to maintain their social connections and thus their health. That said, it seems to me that churches with out-of-city parishioners should invest in providing easy to use shuttles at parking areas near SF’s borders. A church’s shuttle buses/van pool, carpool service could easily bring seniors and others from the Golden Gate Bridge area, West Oakland Bart, Daly City Bart, Caltrian, etc. Point is, the old ways of getting to church need to change to match the lack of legal, free, street parking near many of these city churches. Continuing with the double parking is just dumb.

  • voltairesmistress

    A nice story, and another example of how taking transit often humanizes us, in this case reminding us that we can share space, shield children from potential harm, and reach out to others to assist them.

  • murphstahoe

    My 97 year old grandmother finally retired the keys fairly recently, which is pretty scary given she has started to forget people she doesn’t see with great regularity. But she drove the car a couple of times a week 2 blocks down the street in a quiet middle of nowhere town from her assisted living center to the store or hairdresser, and the only real danger was to the front lawn garden gnomes, so my family didn’t really decide to fight it.

    East Bay folks going to church in SF get to drive over the Bay Bridge with 75 MPH Sunday traffic, and navigate the on/offramps into SF? Yikes!

  • Greg

    Are there any drivers that the bikers on this blog aren’t against? Folks that drive from the East Bay to SF churches on Sundays and are back home before you even get up – you’re against them. You want to ban them from going to church?

  • Transpo_nerdette

    Um, Sunday service at the church mentioned in the article starts at 11am.

  • Bing Wu

    I’m not against anyone driving to church, and have no interest in banning it. I just don’t like them double parking with total impunity, or trying to make Sunday parking free again. What we’re advocating is that anyone can drive anytime they want, this is a free country, but you have to pay market rates for parking and no one gets special treatment, whether that’s for church, exercise, shopping, etc. If you’re elderly and you can afford a car, gas and insurance, you can pay a couple dollars for the parking meter. MUNI isn’t free on Sundays for seniors so why should seniors who drive and double park get a break?

  • Transpo_nerdette

    And it’s not just seniors (though demographics of churchgoers are skewing older and older), but also families. Especially in neighborhoods where whole classes of residents are pushed or priced out like the Western Addition and the Mission. It’s a complicated problem that touches on some big social issues.

  • Greg

    My neighborhood church on Larkin does this each Sunday for most of the
    block. It’s not a matter of the churchgoers not wanting to pay
    (although they may not), it’s a matter of no parking being available
    period – free or not in that ‘hood. I navigate around these double
    parked cars each Sunday without giving it a second thought. Who cares?
    Everyone is so intolerant now. I’m happy to be a tiny bit
    inconvenienced if a family or someone’s grandma from Oakland can go to
    church.

  • murphstahoe

    You know what is intolerant? Telling people who ride bikes that it’s no big deal that the bike lane is blocked for hours on end on Sunday. If you aren’t dealing with that issue, then who are you to discern whether or not it’s a problem that the bike lane I spent hours sitting in SFMTA and Board of Supervisors meetings scratching and clawing to get can be ignored?

  • murphstahoe

    I’m also not very tolerant of someone driving to some place where there is no parking available period, and being suprised that there is no parking available there period, 52 times a year, and thus dumping their problem on someone else. What do they say about doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result?

  • murphstahoe

    This really is the comment of the year.

    “You biker person. Lazy biker person. Do you ever get out of bed you lazy hipster! Lazy hipster with 6 figure hipster google job! Bad hipster. You hate god!”

  • Greg

    It’s called city living – us city dwellers have lived here for many years dealing with blocked roads by cars, cabs, buses, delivery trucks, etc. – we navigate around them and tolerate it. Why can’t bikers? All of a sudden folks are told they can’t go to church since bikers can’t go around their cars during the church service.

  • jonobate

    Because they pose a physical danger to us, rather than a mere inconvenience? If an obstacle suddenly appears in front of us we can’t brake as fast as cars without going over the handlebars, and when we do hit something the consequences are hospital visits and medical bills rather than taking the car to the shop and filing a claim with the insurance company.

  • Bing Wu

    They *can* go to church, they just gotta do it in a way that doesn’t endanger everyone else’s safety, and many of us here are on the case of *anyone* who double parks, like cabs, cop cars, UPS trucks… Why can’t this hypothetical family of yours take the BART from Oakland? Park at a BART station in the East Bay (for free) and take the BART in, walk to church from the SF station and not have to worry about paying meters or blocking streets. Last I checked the BART starts running pretty early on Sundays, well before any church opens its doors. On top of their request to be allowed to double park with impunity, the churches want to dismantle Sunday metering altogether, which is a traffic disaster waiting to happen. Sorry, I support people’s right to go to church and worship but NOT with this much negative impact to everyone else.

  • Greg

    You should use you brake on your back wheel along with the front if you are going over the handlebars when braking. It’s pretty easy to avoid that if you use a back and front brake together.

  • jonobate

    You should get your car the fuck outta my right of way.

  • jonobate

    There’s no parking because everyone’s allowed to park their cars for free all day. If the spots were metered, there would be more spaces available.

    Or, you could enforce the two-hour time limit on Sunday, which is currently only enforced Mon – Sat on Larkin.

  • als

    So nothing should ever change? We should just “tolerate it”?

  • murphstahoe

    All of a sudden folks are told they can’t go to church since bikers can’t go around their cars during the church service.

    “You can’t park in the bike lane” is not “you can’t go to church” you ninny.

  • Prinzrob

    I’m not against myself when I drive. But then again, I don’t expect to be able to double park and for free because God.

  • davistrain

    This is going back a ways, but in Sept 1982 I was in SF to cover the last (or so we thought) day of PCC streetcar operation. I was photographing the “N” line near Duboce Park, and noticing that the congregation in the church across the street was coming out to go home. Two, three or at most four families got on the “N” streetcar, but most of the rest went to their cars for the drive home. Here was (so it appeared) an example of families moving away from the neighborhood but keeping ties with their church. I think that part of the problem is that once people get used to driving, the car becomes the “default setting” and and other mode is “foreign”.

  • voltairesmistress

    I think weekend driving, particularly Sundays, looks different from weekday driving. Sundays we tend to go places all together in one car, sometimes five or six of us. It is more economical than paying 5-6 separate transit fares to and from destinations. Paying for parking, bridge toll, and gas for one carload of people dies not seem too onerous for church or anything else. It is also pretty fun and social traveling in one car together.

    Greg’s Larkin Street church goers really should use a garage, then walk or use a church shuttle from garage to church. Again, the churches’ double parking late into the day seems out of touch with every other person or family’s Sunday travel needs.

    I am beginning to think ministers are fussing about their parishioners’ double parking privilege, because they doubt parishioners’ commitment to attend church if any slight inconvenience or cost were to arise.

  • murphstahoe

    And my observation from an occasional attendance at St Paul’s, a gorgeous church, is that in SF these pastors need to do everything they can to hang on to those churchgoers. I’ve never seen an Easter Mass so empty.

  • Bruce Halperin

    Because car drivers usually can’t get maimed or killed when they are forced to swerve into a lane of other car drivers by a double-parker. People on bikes can, and are.

  • Bruce Halperin

    Banning them from double-parking (i.e., breaking the law) = banning them from going to church? Get real.

  • 94103er

    I dunno, to me this (well-told) anecdote is emblematic of what’s wrong with our city. We continually get screwed out of resources (enough buses, enough bike infrastructure, enough housing) but instead of blaming the true culprit–rent-seeking oligarchs/real-estate moguls/government contractors and ineffective government–the we-were-here-first crowd screams and points fingers at those of us just trying to get by with young kids (and tech jobs) for taking what’s supposedly ‘theirs.’

  • 94103er

    Not to mention the idea of ‘bikers’ only being the types who are childless and have the luxury of sleeping in. Nope, no kids, no moms and dads wanting to get out and roll over to GG Park for the Sunday street closure. Unheard of.

  • Filamino

    What is really scary is night services. I recall one small church on Guerrero Street that allow church goers to park in the median lane and coned it off during services. After it was done, they took the cones away, but the parked cars stayed! I almost rear-ended one while calmly driving down Guerrero and it scared the s@#$ out of me. Of course, it happened to be an old discolored dark colored vehicle with broken tail light.

    Sadly, the only way this will change is when someone gets hurt.

  • @Greg – Here I was laboring under this impression that “this blog” was only troubled by the many problems caused by cars when they were being driven by atheists. Your astute comment made the scales fall from my eyes. Carallujiah!

  • Greg

    Stay classy jonobate!

    I was biking this weekend on Polk with my kids and the biggest problem was actually all the jerk bikers passing them too fast and close and making it harder for them to safely navigate the street. I love the image SFBC/SFMTA likes to promote about increasing biking in SF for families/kids biking. Nothing about the bike culture in SF is about that – it’s about selfish jerks just wanting the city to themselves. Damn the folks that are not able to ride.

  • murphstahoe

    Simple answer Greg. Have your kids ride in the middle of the street so they don’t have to mix it up with those jerk bikers.

  • jonobate

    Dude, I got a broken arm last year due to a driver pulling into the bike lane too quickly in order to double park. For that reason, I take exception to your attitude that double parking is acceptable behavior and cyclists should just learn to live with it.

    Perhaps you need some strong language directed at you to understand that the double parking you support has real physical consequences to more vulnerable road users. So yes, get your car the fuck out of my right of way, and don’t try and give me lectures on how to ride my bike.

  • mikeo

    If your concern is about “selfish jerks just wanting the city to themselves”, you should reread some of your posts above. Double parking is rampant in this city and it causes real danger to people who have to maneuver around it. The apathy that drivers have towards people around them is a much better example of these “selfish jerks”.

  • Greg

    Yes please cuss at me some more – and my kids – in the city, that will help me come around to your cause.

  • murphstahoe

    Greg – there is nothing that will help you come around to his cause. Nobody’s trying to convince you of anything because well, you’re just a troll trying to get a rise out of some people, and looks like you succeeded. But should that trolling align with your actual mindset, know full well that the strategy is not to change your mind, but to outnumber and outmanuever you and your colleagues. And it’s working.

  • gneiss

    To counter your anecdotal story of rude bicyclists over the weekend, I’ll counter it with mine – I rode with my 7 year old daughter and her friend, along with her mother and my wife on the panhandle to and from Golden Gate Park on Sunday afternoon. Despite the fact that my daughter has only completely mastered bicycling over the last month, we experienced no rude behavior and lots of patience from all the other ‘bikers’ around us. I think we each find what we want – I see the best in the people who are cycling around me, while you seem determined to find the worst.

  • murphstahoe

    what’s a brake?