Today’s Headlines

  • Safe Streets Advocates: Under Mayor Lee, SFMTA is Falling Behind on Vision Zero Projects (Examiner)
  • Wiggle Advocate to Publicly Shame Rude Wigglers on Bikes, on Foot, and in Cars (Hoodline)
  • Next Week is Bike and Roll to School Week (SFGate)
  • Marina Residents Riled Up Over Muni Forward Plans to Speed Up 30-Stockton on Chestnut (SocketSite)
  • KALW Interviews SFMTA Board Chair Tom Nolan on the State of Muni
  • Tenderloin’s Third Proposal to Ban Parking to Deter Crime: Eddy By Boeddeker Park (Hoodline)
  • Officers Exiting New SFPD Station in Mission Bay Say They Get Stuck in Traffic on Third Street (KTVU)
  • Transportation Infrastructure Doesn’t Maintain Itself — Especially Not the Golden Gate Bridge (CityLab)
  • Sausalito Councilwoman’s Proposed Limit on Rental Bikes May Not Be Legal (Marin Scope)
  • Two Killed in San Jose Car Crash On VTA Light-Rail Tracks (NBC)
  • CA Bicycle Coalition Says It Lost “a Few Major Donors” to Defeat Mandatory Helmet Law (Cyclelicious)

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

  • hp2ena
  • Gezellig

    Cal Bike gained a member with me!

    As soon as I saw what they were doing to fight the drastic safety and health consequences a helmet law would bring to California I joined.

  • the_greasybear

    Re: “Wiggle Advocate to Publicly Shame Rude Wigglers….”:

    Initiating a negative public interaction with random strangers on the streets of a big city has never, ever been a good idea.

    It doesn’t matter if one feels some sort of kinship with or responsibility for other individuals who utilize the same favored mode of transportation–confrontation of any kind in the streets, even symbolic, can get quickly out of hand. Morgan Fitzgibbons is a smart guy; surely he must know this stunt can backfire. I hope he has planned accordingly.

  • I did, too.

  • Ever wake up in the middle of the night fretting about your city or town’s future? Will the year 2030 find it bereft of nail salons and KFCs, tumbleweeds drifting past junked cars on its corroded streets? Or will your town be happy and healthy, perking along just fine? Take the viability quiz and find out! (Yes, livable streets issues are prominent factors.) Snazzy certificate at the end!

    http://karenlynnallen.blogspot.com/2015/04/do-you-fret-about-future-of-your-town.html

  • thielges

    A news story had characterized the SFPD problem of congestion blocking access to the parking garage as a public safety issue. This is a misunderstanding. The police do not operate the same as the fire department, waiting at the station for an emergency call and then rushing to the scene. Instead the police are constantly mobile and roving their beat. When an emergency call comes, they could be anywhere in their beat area.

    The problem is actually an additional frustration for police officers commuting into and out of their HQ. It eats their time but doesn’t really affect public safety.

  • mx

    Good. There are potential arguments to be made for things like legacy rental car or hotel shuttles without wheelchair lifts that equipping them would be too difficult and expensive. In such cases, companies need to do far more to provide accessible alternatives, but there’s at least an argument to be made for them. Leap already had wheelchair lifts. Accessibility didn’t fit with their aesthetic plan, so they ripped them out. That’s just wrong.

    Sometimes public transit is more difficult or expensive to operate because it actually has to serve the public at large with all of our many quirks and behaviors.

  • mx

    By the way, the best part is this sentence: “In its terms of service, Leap says it “does not provide transportation services,” and that it is “not a transportation carrier.””

    Uber and Lyft at least have a vaguely colorable argument on this front, in that they can claim that they are networks that connect riders to drivers. Leap, on the other hand, is called “Leap Transit, Inc” for crying out loud. Their website talks about “our buses” and indicates that “Every bus has a Leap team member on board.” What are they selling if they aren’t providing transportation services? Do they think they are just an elaborate coconut water distribution service? Not buying it.

  • theqin

    If the SFPD switched to bikes they would not get stuck in traffic. If the SFPD commuted to their new station on the T line then muni would be safer.

  • 94110

    Having been nearly run over by a cruiser exiting the Mission Station (17th and Valencia) at high speed (driving fully across the sidewalk before taking the time to flip on the siren) seconds before a dozen plus officers came sprinting out of the station towards cars, I’m not sure I can completely accept your statement.

    On the other hand, I’m not sure requiring me to physically leap out of the way improves public safety.

    Maybe congestion will keep people safer.

  • Uber and Lyft at least have a vaguely colorable argument on this front,
    in that they can claim that they are networks that connect riders to
    drivers.

    Not really — if you take out the whole transportation element of these services, you have nothing left. No matter how they try to spin it, at the end of the day you’re paying for someone to take you somewhere.

  • jd_x

    I think you’re right for most cases, but there are definitely cases when the police respond directly from the station. Like @94110 said, I’ve definitely seen cops go racing out of the 17th St & Valencia station and flip on their lights. So I think you do raise a valid point in a large difference between fire departments and police departments, but I still think it’s hard to argue that cops getting stuck in traffic in front of the station helps public safety.

  • Mesozoic Polk

    The Mayor gets his eyes checked at the visionary office of Hiura & Hiura on Polk Street, so clearly he can’t be the person with the vision problems.

  • The 30-Stockton improvements would help that route compete with services like Leap! Take the survey here, if you think your input differs from the Marina Community Association:

    https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/chestnutsurvey

    I’ve been to a few equivalent meetings for the 22-Fillmore Transit Priority Project, and have actually been pleased with the level of support for these kinds of improvements.

  • Andy Chow

    Leap does have a CPUC permit so it is a transportation provider.

  • Andy Chow

    My feeling is that the person who filed the complaint isn’t going to use the service and doesn’t care if it goes away. If he lives in New York why not file a complaint against every dollar van in his town? Is having some kind of venture capital funding and a professional brand makes it more worthy of a complaint?

    The reality is that Leap provides a supplemental service, not lifeline core transit service. Leap is taking nothing away for those who want to ride Muni. Muni will continue to provide accessible service on the corridor and will provide para-transit service for those who can’t access fixed route Muni.

  • murphstahoe

    My feeling is

    “we came for the blah…, and I did not care because I was not blah…”

    Leap is setting a bad precedent. It’s one thing to have a shop in a building that needs to be retrofitted. Leap intentionally converted their buses from ADA compliant to not. That’s junk.

  • Andy Chow

    Although it is not something I would do, but where it says it is illegal? If so, why did CHP approved it for operation? (every bus, including charter and transit, needs to be inspected by CHP before revenue operation.)

  • murphstahoe

    Does CHP have anything to do with ADA?

  • mx

    I didn’t say they have a winning argument, just that it’s at least an argument grounded in a vague notion of a reality somewhat similar to the one we share. Leap’s argument that it doesn’t provide transportation services doesn’t remotely pass the sniff test.

  • Andy Chow

    If I were to convert an emergency window into a fixed window and removed fire extinguisher, CHP isn’t going to approve my vehicle. If somehow the engine doesn’t meet emission standard, then you can’t register the vehicle at the DMV. If there’a a law that forbid anyone from removing an accessible device, or whatever accessible device must be in operating condition (not just left broken and not fixed), then that is another ground for non-approval.