Friday Round-up: Contra Costa’s Vision Zero Survey, Caltrain Improves Grade Crossings

And a short update on repairs to Oakland's estuary channel bike and pedestrian path

From Contra Costa's interactive map/survey page.
From Contra Costa's interactive map/survey page.

Contra Costa County Seeks Feedback on Dangerous Roads and Intersections:

Do you live in Contra Costa County and want to see safer streets? Then be sure to check out the county’s Vision Zero poll and interactive map. The county is gearing up to reduce deaths and serious injuries–and planners are hoping to convince their bosses at the Board of Supervisors to join the Vision Zero Coalition. First step: identifying the County’s most dangerous corridors and working out ways to fix them.

Sidewalk closed ahead + no pedestrian crossings at the intersection of Sun Valley Road and 680. Typical of how pedestrians are treated in Contra Costa County. Photo: Streetsblog/Rudick
Sidewalk closed ahead + no pedestrian crossings at the intersection of Sun Valley Road and 680 in Contra Costa. Photo: Streetsblog/Rudick

“We’re doing the investigation first,” explained Colin Piethe, a planner with the county. “We’ve just been slowly gearing up this program and haven’t officially adopted Vision Zero.”

Caltrain Finishes Grade Crossing Upgrades Ahead of Schedule:

Concrete divider and new paint at the crossing on Churchill Ave. in Palo Alto, where Caltrain had a vehicle strike last year and two in 2017. Photo: Caltrain
Concrete divider and new paint at the crossing on Churchill Ave. in Palo Alto, where Caltrain had a vehicle strike last year and two in 2017. Photo: Caltrain

Caltrain has completed upgrades to 15 grade crossings on its corridor. From the agency:

This effort to improve public safety at 15 grade crossings from San Francisco to San Jose began in June 2018 and was expected to be finished by March of this year. The project included repainting, pouring new concrete, gluing down new tactile markers, installing street medians, improving sidewalks, installing new signage and removing outdated materials.

The project cost $3.5 million, with $1.06 million coming from the Federal Rail Administration and $377,000 from State Prop 1B funds. The remainder of the funding came from Caltrain’s Capital budget. A full list of the locations where work was done can be found here.

Of course, as Caltrain electrified and High-speed Rail comes on line, one would hope most if not eventually all grade crossings will be eliminated.

Estuary Channel Update:

And last but not least, Bike East Bay’s Rob Prinz brought this to our attention on the battle to get Oakland’s estuary-to-Lake Merritt bike path repaired.

That was from Monday. Streetsblog did another survey ride this morning and it looks as if things have progressed a little bit more (even less water and trash, at least in places, but some of that could just be because the rains have let up). We’re still hopeful Oakland Public Works will repave and really fix and continue to maintain the path. We’ll keep an eye on it.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Pleasant Hill Canal Trail Crossing Upgrades Grand Opening

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From EBBC: The City of Pleasant Hill has recently completed significant enhancements to six of the major trail crossings throughout the city. Mayor Hanecak and city officials will conduct a ‘switch-on’ ceremony of the signal lights. The public is welcome to attend the event. The Citywide Trail Crossing Enhancement Project consisted of constructing access and visibility […]