SF Gets First Protected Bike Lane! Drivers Already Violating It

protected_bike_lane.jpgA bicyclist rides in SF's first protected bike lane. Photos by Bryan Goebel.
DPT crews installed San Francisco's first physically separated bike lane this morning on a westbound stretch of an existing bike lane on Market Street between 9th and 10th, and before workers had even finished putting in the final safe-hit post, some drivers began disrespecting it, rolling into the lane, causing bicyclists to merge into auto traffic.

"This isn't going to last long!," one of the DPT workers shouted, as he scrambled to the scene to prevent the driver of an animal control vehicle parked on the sidewalk from breaking through the safe-hit posts (see the photos below the break).

The 35 three-foot tall reflective posts were tacked onto Market Street with AP epoxy, which takes up to 24 hours to dry. While they're designed to flip back up if a driver rolls over them, they're vulnerable until they dry.

Some passersby suggested the MTA needs to install more signage for drivers, or do something more bold like paint the lane green so drivers get the message they need to stay out. 

Although the protected bike lane is considered a trial, Streetsblog has learned the MTA has plans to turn existing bike lanes into protected lanes on Market from 8th to 12th.

van_in_bike_lane.jpgPlease don't run over the posts!
car_in_bike_lane.jpgA bicyclist is forced out of the protected bike lane, which is 8 feet wide, giving drivers enough room to disrespect the lane.
dpt_crew_with_ap_epoxy.jpgDPT crew puts the AP epoxy on the the base of the post.
prot_1.jpg