Today’s Headlines

  • SFBG: The Era of Free Parking in SF May Be Over, but MTA Has Some Bitter Pills to Swallow, Too
  • Mail Truck Driver Badly Injures Woman on Bike in the Richmond (SFGate)
  • Supervisors Campos, Wiener Picked as Chair, Vice Chair of SFCTA Board (City Insider)
  • SFCTA Ponders Ways To Get High Speed Rail in SF More Quickly (SF ExaminerBCN via SF Appeal)
  • BART More Than Doubles Number of Electronic Bike Lockers (Castro Valley Patch)
  • SMART Tells North Sonoma County Train Fans to Keep the Faith (Press Democrat)
  • Bay Bridge Demolition to Last Longer Than First Projected (SF Examiner)
  • Public Transportation’s Hidden Gender Imbalance (Atlantic Cities)
  • Today’s Urban Planners Explore How to Facilitate Pedestrian Desire Lines (The Economist)
  • Ten Lessons From the World’s Great Biking Cities (Grist)
More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill
  • A cyclist was hurt when a USPS truck violated the right of way and hit her: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2012/02/01/BAOV1N1JST.DTL&tsp=1

  • Aaron Bialick

    Thanks for catching that, I added it in.

  • mikesonn

    “A preliminary investigation shows that the postal truck did not come to a complete stop before entering the intersection, Esparza said. The cyclist had the right of way, he said.

    The postal worker cooperated with police and was not cited, Esparza said.”

  • And unlike the case from a couple days ago near the Panhandle, we know the driver was in the wrong. And yet again, SFPD refuses to cite.

  • “Can Economy Bear What Oil Prices Have in Store?”

    Summary of article on Peak Oil published in Nature magazine. (The entire Nature article is behind a pay wall.)

    http://www.washington.edu/news/articles/commentary-in-nature-can-economy-bear-what-oil-prices-have-in-store

    “The ‘tipping point’ for oil supply appears to have occurred around 2005,
    says Murray, who compared world crude oil production with world prices
    going back to 1998. Before 2005, supply of regular crude oil was elastic
    and increased in response to price increases. Since then, production
    appears to have hit a wall at 75 million barrels per day in spite of
    price increases of 15 percent each year.”

    Combined with increasing oil use in China, India and most oil-exporting countries, we can expect America’s oil consumption to continue its forced decline. Whether it happens in two years or five, hauling around our own 3000 lbs of metal with us wherever we go will soon become the privilege of an elite few. If Americans really understood what lies ahead for us, there would be less clamoring for free parking and free roads and frantic urgency for public transit and safe bicycling instead.

    “Watch Out For Peaks Ahead”
    http://karenlynnallen.blogspot.com/2011/11/watch-out-for-peaks-ahead.html

  • Anonymous

    Damnit this irritates me so much. I would love to corner a city official on this issue in private and get them to explain this mentality to me. I’m pretty sure I could convince any reasonable person that this is not acceptable behavior. We need to keep pushing for this discussion at the societal level and raising awareness of how much bias our society has against non-motorists.

    Today’s motorists are kinda of like the landed gentry of feudal Europe who are the only ones who wield any real power. They are also kind of like the founding fathers of the US who said one thing (“everybody” is equal …) so they could feel noble about themselves and claim that they were better than those they were trying to overthrow, but actually meant another ( … unless you are black, a woman, or non-Christian). Today’s city governments say they espouse the idea that all road users are equal, yet their actions show that they are heavily biased towards motorists.

  • @jd_x:disqus Yes, I agree. We need to stop tolerating collateral damage from the almighty automobile and treat this as what it is: vehicular assault.