Today’s Headlines

  • Supes Approve Transit Impact Development Fee With Full Non-Profit Exemption (SFExamSFBG)
  • SFMTA Board Finally Approves Free Muni for Low-Income Youth (City InsiderSFExamABCCBS)
  • SF Weekly: Churches Can Handle Sunday Metering, Just Like Synagogues Do on Saturdays
  • More on the SFMTA’s Pagoda Plan for Central Subway Drill Extraction in North Beach (SFGate)
  • Planning Dept. to Release Privately-Owned Public Spaces Guide (SFGate)
  • BART Survey Seeks Customer Feedback on Market-Rate Parking Fees Proposal
  • Female Cyclist Shot, Killed Near California Street Bike Blvd. in Berkeley (BerkeleysideMercCBS)
  • Driver Pleads ‘Not Guilty’ to Killing San Mateo Pedestrian in Hit-and-Run (CBS)
  • Napa VINE Buses Double Frequency by Removing Stops (Register)
  • Alameda County Faces Transpo Budget Crisis With Failure of Measure B1 (EBX)
  • Bad Loan Deal Sticks AC Transit with Ex-Manager’s Foreclosed Home (SFGate)
  • BART Spent $5M Avoiding Bird-Related Construction Delays to Fremont Extension (Merc)
  • Roadshow Argues for Lowering 2/3 Vote Majority Threshold for Increasing Transpo Taxes

More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • Charles_Siegel

    Here is another important piece of news that I haven’t seen on streetsblog:

    The
    first regional plan passed under landmark SB 375 requiring MPOs to
    reduce greenhouse gas emissions has failed a key test. Environmental
    plaintiffs sued because transit investments were in the future. They
    won, forcing SANDAG to redo their plan.

    The lawsuit was a major test of California’s landmark climate protection law, SB 375,
    which requires regional planning agencies to reduce
    transporation-related greenhouse gas emissions. The regional planning
    agency for the San Diego area, SANDAG, was the first of the 18 metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) in the state to prepare such a long range plan under the 2008 climate law.

    On Dec. 4, “Superior Court Judge Timothy Taylor ruled that the San
    Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) violated state law by failing
    to fully account for, and take steps to reduce, climate pollution in its
    environmental review of the region’s long-term transportation plan in
    the environmental review of the Long Term Plan. The ruling is a major
    rebuke to regional planners in the San Diego region and a warning shot
    to other regional planning organizations that just passing a plan and
    calling it green is no longer enough.”

    “The court is setting an important example here for regional planning
    agencies throughout California,” said Kathryn Phillips, director of Sierra Club California.
    “We cannot wait another 40 years to adopt sensible transportation and
    land-use policies. Thanks to California laws requiring public agencies
    to be open about their plans, we were able to hold SANDAG accountable
    for its faulty planning practices.”
     http://www.planetizen.com/node/59576

  • Charles_Siegel

    Here is another important piece of news that I haven’t seen on streetsblog:

    The
    first regional plan passed under landmark SB 375 requiring MPOs to
    reduce greenhouse gas emissions has failed a key test. Environmental
    plaintiffs sued because transit investments were in the future. They
    won, forcing SANDAG to redo their plan.

    The lawsuit was a major test of California’s landmark climate protection law, SB 375,
    which requires regional planning agencies to reduce
    transporation-related greenhouse gas emissions. The regional planning
    agency for the San Diego area, SANDAG, was the first of the 18 metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) in the state to prepare such a long range plan under the 2008 climate law.

    On Dec. 4, “Superior Court Judge Timothy Taylor ruled that the San
    Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) violated state law by failing
    to fully account for, and take steps to reduce, climate pollution in its
    environmental review of the region’s long-term transportation plan in
    the environmental review of the Long Term Plan. The ruling is a major
    rebuke to regional planners in the San Diego region and a warning shot
    to other regional planning organizations that just passing a plan and
    calling it green is no longer enough.”

    “The court is setting an important example here for regional planning
    agencies throughout California,” said Kathryn Phillips, director of Sierra Club California.
    “We cannot wait another 40 years to adopt sensible transportation and
    land-use policies. Thanks to California laws requiring public agencies
    to be open about their plans, we were able to hold SANDAG accountable
    for its faulty planning practices.”
     http://www.planetizen.com/node/59576

  • @0c6a1ba3c059e75968ce271f4ea79d78:disqus That Planetizen article is actually based on Streetsblog LA’s article: http://la.streetsblog.org/2012/12/04/judge-rules-transportation-plan-in-san-diego-violates-state-greenhouse-gas-laws/