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Posts from the "SFMTA" Category

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Eyes on the Street: New On-Street Car-Share Parking Spots in Action

A pair of new Zipcar spots at 20th Avenue and Irving Street. Photo: Aaron Bialick

The first in a new wave of on-street car-share parking spaces are on the ground, kicking off the eventual roll-out of 900 spots planned by the SFMTA.

I spotted the pair of Zipcar spots above on 20th Avenue at Irving Street in the Sunset on Saturday, and they were apparently already being used. The first time I passed by, the spots were both empty, but later one car had been returned.

As more locations like these make car-share more convenient and visible, car ownership is expected to decline: each car-share vehicle replaces nine to 13 privately-owned autos, on average. It’s a statistic we’ve continually reported, and it means these spots will make more parking available — but that’s still often ignored by those who call these space conversions “privatization.”

SF has already had a dozen on-street car-share spots in place for a couple of years ago as part of an SFMTA pilot, but now the real proliferation has begun. If you spot others, feel free to share photos in the comments.

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Muni Metro “Double Berthing” Delayed Again — Wait Until November

Muni has yet again postponed the launch of simultaneously loading two trains in each of its Metro stations, also known as “double berthing.” We last reported that the practice was supposed to begin this month, but SFMTA spokesperson Paul Rose said the new timeline is “early November,” with no specific date set yet.

While Muni riders salivate for what might seem like a simple step that would speed up underground boardings, Muni Operations Director John Haley has cited “issues with the platform signs and trains” for the delays. Apparently, setting up the software to work with the automatic train control system is turning out to be quite a challenge.

Originally, double berthing was supposed to launch in October 2012. Now, we can only hope it will launch before the new light rail fleet starts running.

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New 5L-Fulton Limited Muni Line Has Brought 2,000 More Daily Riders

Photo: SFMTA

Muni’s one-year-old 5L-Fulton Limited service, which provides a crosstown trip 15 percent faster than the 5-Fulton, has attracted 2,000 additional daily riders to the bus route. That’s according to new data from the SFMTA.

“This is what Transit First looks like,” said Peter Lauterborn, an aide to Supervisor Eric Mar. “We need to keep investing in transit.” Lauterborn is also the manager of the No on Prop L campaign, although Mar’s office isn’t officially associated with it.

Limited-stop service on the 5 has been met with virtually universal praise ever since it was introduced as a pilot project last October, and later made permanent by the SFMTA. The agency also made improvements that speed up both local and limited service, like a road diet that created wider lanes for buses on one section, and removing some lesser-used stops. The SFMTA also plans to install transit-priority traffic signals and bus bulbs along the route.

It’s unclear how many of the 2,000 additional riders are new Muni riders, or shifted from other routes. More details are expected to be presented to the SFMTA Board of Directors at its meeting on Tuesday.

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SFMTA Launches a Smarter Safe Streets Ad Campaign

The SFMTA has launched a new ad campaign called “Safe Streets SF” that takes the most thoughtful approach to addressing the causes of pedestrian injuries of any city campaign thus far.

The ads have started rolling out on Muni buses. One depicts cars stopped in front of a busy, unmarked crosswalk, with the text, “It Stops Here.” A side panel says “all intersections are crosswalks” — a message aimed at combating the misconception that crosswalks aren’t legal unless they’re marked.

“We’ll be targeting the driver violations of pedestrian rights-of-way that are responsible for nearly two-thirds of all pedestrian collisions,” said SFMTA Director Ed Reiskin at an agency board meeting yesterday. “We’re trying not to just put random ads out there, but to really be thoughtful and strategic about what behaviors we’re targeting.”

Reiskin said the campaign, part of Vision Zero, is a collaboration between the SFMTA, SFPD, Department of Public Health, and Walk SF. Next month, it will be complemented by “24 high-visibility enforcement days” from police on streets with high rates of pedestrian injuries. “Officers will be on the streets citing drivers for violating pedestrian rights-of-way,” Reiskin said, noting that it will add to SFPD’s ongoing “Focus on the Five” enforcement campaign.

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NYC’s Tom Maguire Expected to Lead at the SFMTA, if Mayor Lee Lets Him

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Ever since we broke the news that New York City’s Tom Maguire would be hired as the new director of the SFMTA’s Sustainable Streets Division, we’ve heard only positive reactions. If nothing else, there’s a lot of hype building for this promising veteran of the livable streets renaissance seen under Janette Sadik-Khan‘s NYC Department of Transportation. On the other hand, Sadik-Khan and her executive staff had the full support of former NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

The SFMTA did its part for the hype with a press release that was rife with praise from officials in both SF and NYC. Here’s JSK herself:

From rolling out the fastest bus routes in New York City to devising groundbreaking parking policies, Tom Maguire worked on some of the most innovative changes to New York City streets over the last eight years. But the Big Apple’s loss is the Bay Area’s gain. With his one-of-a-kind mix of creative policy skills, technical expertise and political savvy, there’s no one better equipped to deliver world-class streets and chart San Francisco on a course to safer, more sustainable future.

Polly Trottenberg, Sadik-Khan’s successor at NYC DOT, said Maguire is “a remarkable leader [who] oversaw some of NYC DOT’s major initiatives from PlaNYC and post-Sandy resiliency to the Select Bus Service partnership and Freight Mobility. We will miss his vision and energy in New York.”

“The Giants moving to San Francisco in the late 50s had a big impact in the baseball world, and Tom Maguire becoming SFMTA Sustainable Streets Director is a big win for San Francisco in the transportation field,” she added.

While SF advocates don’t have experience with Maguire, they say his reputation holds a lot of promise, but that his ability to help the SFMTA make strides in advancing sustainable streets will depend on backing from Mayor Ed Lee and SFMTA Director Ed Reiskin.

“The importance of this position cannot be emphasized enough,” said SF Bicycle Coalition Executive Director Leah Shahum. “Mr. Maguire will need to bring a combination of high-level vision, and the ability to roll-up-his-sleeves, to ensure that projects get delivered in a timely way. And it’s critical that he has the support of MTA Chief Ed Reiskin. There’s never been a more opportune time for strong leadership to transform the SFMTA and help San Francisco’s transportation systems live up to their potential.”

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SFMTA Taps Tom Maguire From NYC DOT to Run Sustainable Streets Division

We have word from a reliable source that the new SFMTA Sustainable Streets Director will be Tom Maguire, a highly regarded executive at the New York City Department of Transportation, where he served throughout the tenure of Janette Sadik-Khan, most recently as assistant commissioner of project development.

At NYC DOT, Maguire oversaw a broad range of public space, transit, and parking management projects. Among the initiatives under his watch was NYC DOT’s Select Bus Service program, which involves upgrades to surface transit similar to the Muni Transit Effectiveness Project. He also led research and communications related to NYC’s new public plazas and other street redesigns, and was instrumental in developing a sophisticated congestion pricing system that, while never implemented due to political cowardice in the state capital, was fully fleshed out and ready to roll in America’s largest city.

As we wrote in March, the next Sustainable Streets Director will play a critical role in delivering effective pedestrian safety improvements, a robust network of protected bike lanes, and faster and more reliable Muni service. The Sustainable Streets Division encompasses all of the agency’s street design and parking management work, and its leader will have to stand up to the vocal minority who fight tooth and nail to preserve the status quo on the streets. Maguire brings seven years of experience working for Sadik-Khan and former mayor Michael Bloomberg, who made NYC DOT a nationally-renowned leader in that department.

SFMTA spokesperson Paul Rose said he couldn’t comment on whether Maguire was indeed the selected candidate, but that an announcement would be made this week.

Update: The SFMTA officially announced Maguire’s hire and said he will start October 14.

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MoveOn.org Apologizes for Promotion of “Stop SFMTA” Free Parking Petition

Screenshot from MoveOn.org

An online petition against parking meters in San Francisco has been gathering thousands of signatures ever since it was launched two years ago on MoveOn.org, a website that claims to host petitions that support “progressive” causes. It’s pretty easy to collect signatures from disgruntled drivers who have been stung by parking tickets, and who glance at a petition without being informed about the benefits of demand-based parking pricing. But MoveOn has actually been promoting the petition, helping to get the 4,000-some signatures it has today.

Last week, MoveOn finally sent out an email announcing that its endorsement was a mistake.

“We messed up,” read the subject line of the email posted in a screenshot on Twitter by Roy Mckenzie, editor of the blog The Castro Biscuit. The email was authored by Maria Tchijov, MoveOn’s platform campaign director.

The petition, bluntly titled “Stop SFMTA,” was originally started by the Eastern Neighborhoods United Front to oppose the proposed expansion of SFpark meters into the Dogpatch, Potrero Hill, and northeast Mission neighborhoods. The SFMTA later ended its plans for meters in those neighborhoods, except for the Mission, where plans were first delayed and then watered down. Since then, the petition’s content description has been revised to adapt to the latest fads sweeping the free-parking-for-all crowd. Today, the petition lists its support for Proposition L, crafted by the SF Republican Party and funded by tech billionaire Sean Parker.

At this point, the vague petition is basically an amorphous snowball that’s swept up any and all anger against parking tickets in SF, and ditched any specific goals it originally claimed to have. The target of its anti-SFMTA, anti-meter campaign is routinely moved, with the only apparent end in sight being the enshrinement of free parking (the goal of Prop L).

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Prop L Proponent Makes False Accusations Against SFBC, SFMTA About Polk

Chris Bowman, a Republican proponent of the Prop L “Restore Transportation Balance” ballot measure, aimed false accusations at the SF Bicycle Coalition and pro-bike SFMTA officials in a panel discussion this week.

Chris Bowman, right, with Supervisor Scott Wiener at a panel discussion this week. Photo: Aaron Bialick

Bowman and Supervisor Scott Wiener were featured at the forum, organized by the Alice B. Toklas LGBT Democratic Club, to discuss Prop L. The proposition claims to promote motorists’ interests, calling to enshrine free parking and build more garages. Prop L is funded by tech billionaire and Mayor Ed Lee backer Sean Parker and the SF Republican Party.

Even though nobody else at the meeting brought up the SFBC in discussing Prop L’s implications, Bowman devoted much of his speaking time to attacking bike lanes, and making false claims about the SFBC and SFMTA Vice Chair Cheryl Brinkman.

Bowman said that the SFBC urged a boycott of certain Polk Street merchants who had opposed removing car parking for protected bike lanes: ”The Bicycle Coalition, to add insult to injury, got the transcripts from [an SFMTA Board] hearing and put on their website, ‘these people testified, these are their businesses, boycott them because they’re anti-bike’… That is hardball politics and that does not create a respectful dialogue. That never should have been tolerated by anyone.”

In fact, the SFBC did the opposite — the organization has “actively encouraged our members, and the broader bike community, to frequent Polk Street businesses — and show support for biking to local businesses on popular bike routes,” said SFBC Executive Director Leah Shahum. ”Those claims are absolutely untrue.”

As to where such misconceptions could come from, Shahum noted that the SFBC did hear from individual members, who had urged the organization to launch a boycott through social media posts on Facebook. She said she suspected that those spreading the lie could have misconstrued such messages, although they were written by individuals who don’t speak for the SFBC.

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Watch Muni Explain the Need to Crack Down on Parking Scofflaws — In 1988

When it comes to effectively enforcing parking regulations to make San Francisco’s streets work more efficiently, SF hasn’t changed much since 1988.

A parking control officer marking a tire to enforce time limits in 1988. Image via Youtube

That’s when Muni planner Jerry Robbins created the above video, explaining why it’s so important to keep drivers from parking in transit-only lanes or blocking intersections, and to make sure delivery drivers aren’t hogging loading zones all day. Today, Robbins is the interim director of SFMTA’s Sustainable Streets Division, and he said he still shows the video to the planning staff he oversees.

“When I look at the video, I think of how similar things are today,” said Robbins. “The cars look different, but everything else looks pretty much the same. I think the lesson of the video is still valid.”

Robbins said the video was created at a time when city planners were considering some of the transit-boosting upgrades to street infrastructure that are now being implemented today, as part of the Muni Transit Effectiveness Project — new transit-only lanes, transit-priority signals, and bus bulbs. Last year, the SFMTA began painting transit-only lanes red on downtown streets to help keep drivers out of them, without the need to issue tickets.

But it wasn’t until recently that the city focused on making those kinds of improvements. In 1988, Robbins said the now-defunct Department of Parking and Traffic made some changes to more effectively enforce against parking violations, primarily by increasing parking ticket fines.

“It wasn’t to preclude anything, but just to treat enforcement as one of the things in the toolbox that should be considered with all the other new regulations,” he said. ”Enforcement alone can be a big game changer.”

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SFMTA to Paint the Transit Lanes Red on Mid-Market This Weekend

Red paint will be added to send a stronger message that private auto drivers should stay out of mid-Market Street’s transit-only lanes. Photo: Google Maps

The SFMTA announced that red paint will be added this weekend to the transit- and taxi-only lanes on mid-Market Street, between Fifth and 12th Streets. The treatment, already rolled out recently on bus lanes on Third Street and the Geary-O’Farrell Street couplet, is intended to make it more obvious that private auto drivers shouldn’t be in the heavily-abused Muni lanes.

“These lanes represent a low-cost, but high-impact measure to decrease travel time, by preventing cars from using transit-only lanes,” SFMTA Director Ed Reiskin said in a statement.

The red paint is one of several short-term measures the SFMTA plans to take to help keep Muni moving on Market, along with re-timing traffic signals and adding cross-hatched markings in intersections to tell drivers not to “block the box.”

The coloring should help — it’s appeared to be fairly effective at keeping drivers out of the way of Muni vehicles on Church Street. But it’ll still be a while before the SFMTA takes stronger measures, like more car diversions and extending the transit-only lanes east of Fifth, and further into downtown. Those improvements aren’t expected to come until next year at the earliest.

The SFMTA said construction on the Market transit lanes will happen at night.

A transit lane on Third Street was painted red in March. Photo: SFMTA