Sunday Streets Bayview/Dogpatch

Bikes, Dancers, Advocates, a Tightrope--and Goats

Music, shows, and art dominated the streets of the Bayview and Dogpatch neighborhoods yesterday. All photos Roger Rudick/Streetsblog
Music, shows, and art dominated the streets of the Bayview and Dogpatch neighborhoods yesterday. All photos Roger Rudick/Streetsblog

Circus performers, live bands, advocates, and even a few farm animals enjoyed the sunshine of yesterday’s “Sunday Streets” through the Dogpatch and Bayview neighborhoods. This Sunday Streets took up a roughly three-mile stretch of the southbound lanes of Third Street, which was closed to cars from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

And unlike Sunday Streets in other locations, such as the Mission, this one was long enough–with empty stretches–that it was possible to get some biking in too. That said, it still did its primary job of getting people out to meet their neighbors and explore the area. Streetsblog’s first stop was at Cargo Way, where Spock (seen below) and Marvin were busy eating weeds.

Spoke was happily dining on weeds. Live long and baaaaa.
Spock thought it was logical to eat weeds. Live long and baaaaaa.

These goats are part of a small herd maintained near here by City Grazing, a not-for-profit landscaping business which thinks it has a better–and certainly more ecological–solution than lawn mowers and weed killer for maintaining brush and controlling unwanted plants.

“We have half the herd at the Presidio,” explained Maria Ascarrunz, a volunteer with the group. She said not only do the goats clear the weeds, but they leave the roots–to maintain the stability of hillsides–and, uh, fertilize the soil as they’re working. Plus they can get into difficult corners where lawnmowers have a tough time. “They can also access a steep hillside.” The goats are available for hire for anyone looking to clear some weeds and brush. They even readily eat up some of San Francisco’s nastier plants, such as poison oak.

Volunteers Maria Ascarrunz and Julia Molla were shepherding the heard at Sunday Streets.
Volunteers Maria Ascarrunz and Julia Molla were shepherding at Sunday Streets.

Meanwhile, Jon Downing of Bay Natives  was there with chickens. Downing says they get quite a few customers from Oakland and other places where, he explained, people have some room to keep a few hens–three, he said, is normally the maximum allowed inside the city. Several toddlers were out with their parents enjoying the Sunday Streets events, and the kids seemed delighted to see goats and chickens. Downing said that it’s great to see the reactions of kids who’ve never seen a farm animal “outside of a package in the supermarket.”

Jon Downing was clucking about his favorite chicken, "Falcon."
Jon Downing, holding “Falcon,” clucked about how much he likes Sunday Streets.

Next door to them, the EcoCenter of Heron’s Head Park and Linda Hunter of the Wild Oyster Project were educating children about the role of oyster reefs in protecting the coastline and controlling tidal surges that could flood San Francisco. The EcoCenter had a tray of water that they encouraged children to fill with clay and bead “reefs” to simulate the effect of reefs in slowing down rushing water. The volunteers tilted the trays to show how the waves are attenuated. That’s why these groups are working to encourage more oyster growth in key locations around the Bay. Hunter explained they accomplish this by dropping large hollow balls, made of crushed shell and concrete, that live oysters adhere to. “It gets covered with oysters and other critters,” she said.

Using this small model, volunteers showed how encouraging reef growth can help control dangerous tides.
Using this small model, volunteers showed how encouraging reef growth can help control dangerous tides.

Meanwhile, a bit further south, SFMTA had a booth. SFMTA Board Chairman Joél Ramos was there, answering questions and hearing comments. One woman complained that there weren’t enough places to buy and load Clipper cards, so he explained how to use Clipper’s Autoload feature. Adrienne Heim said SFMTA was out there to hear from the community about service issues. She also gave out information on the San Francisco Beautiful/Muni Art program to display artwork in and on transit vehicles.

Adrienne Heim with a display from the Muni Art program.
Adrienne Heim with a display from the Muni Art program.

Streetsblog mentioned to Heim how this particular Sunday Streets seemed to highlight an issue that’s surely on the minds of people who live or work in the area: the slow speed of the T-Third. She explained that speeds, in downtown at least, will improve with the completion of the Central Subway, since the train will have a more direct route to Market Street. Still, it’s hard to understand why such a new line–it opened in 2007–doesn’t get preemption at intersections and doesn’t even have an exclusive lane on much of Third. She said things could be sped up but it will “depend on funding.”

Speaking of which, the lack of a transit-only lane on parts of Third contributed to an unwieldy situation: every southbound train had to be preceded by a truck to clear people off the tracks. Also, closing only the southbound lanes for the event seemed to confuse motorists. Streetsblog saw a couple of cars wander into the closed lanes, only to be shooed away.

On the other hand, the T-Third line stops were integrated into this Sunday Streets, so those who didn’t want to bike or drive could get on and off and travel easily to different parts of the event.

Muni LRVs had to be "escorted" by a pickup truck to help get people off the tracks during the event.
Muni LRVs had to be “escorted” by a pickup truck to help get people off the tracks during the event.

Near one of the stops a band played and there was a tightrope set up (seen in the lead photo) for kids and adults to try out.

Another stretch of third.
Another stretch of Third Street.

There was also a cast of familiar characters from other open-street events, such as Vision Zero’s “Vision Zero Hero.” And the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition was out there recruiting and advocating for more and better bike lanes–which Third Street could certainly use. Although this Sunday was a great time to ride a bike in the Dogpatch and Bayview, having no bike lane on Third makes for some pretty uncomfortable riding on any other day.

It was a delightful event–made all the better by the perfect weather. Did you attend Sunday Streets in the Bayview and Dogpatch neighborhoods? What were your impressions? Comment below.

First, a few more pics.

The Vision Zero hero.
The Vision Zero hero.
Hannah Cole, a volunteer with the Bike Coalition, with their new banners.
Hannah Cole, a volunteer with the Bike Coalition, with their new banners.
Another side street with more attractions.
Another side street with more attractions.
A stretch of Third where Muni has transit-only lanes. As on any normal day, things worked more smoothly on these portions.
A stretch of third where Muni has transit-only lanes. As on any normal day, things worked more smoothly on these portions.

 

  • Henry

    BTW, yesterday marked 10 years and 2 days when the T first went into service.

  • Frank Kotter

    Would have loved to have been in the room when it was decided that a 4 ton truck was needed to drive in front of the tram to ‘keep people safe’.

  • ahwr

    Saturday+sunday March to Christmas Portland has an outdoor market full of tourists not paying attention that straddles the light rail tracks.

    Trains go slow, ding their bells, people get out of the way.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Sunday Streets: Bayview and Dogpatch

|
From Sunday Streets: This will be our 5th year Sunday Streets visits the Bayview and Dogpatch neighborhoods. With over three and a half miles of car-free space, this is one of the longest Sunday Streets routes and a great opportunity to explore San Francisco neighborhoods by bike. In 2014, we’re pleased to partner with the Stern […]

Play Streets Planning Meeting

|
 From D10 Watch: Sunday Streets annual Bayview/Dogpatch event is June 9 and we are introducing a new program, Play Streets For All in the Bayview this Summer so we have exciting programs to discuss with you, we hope you can join us this coming Tuesday, April 2 as we get planning underway. A big thank you to […]

Sunday Streets

|
From Livable City: Sunday Streets 2011 is underway with monthly events happening the second Sunday of every month and continuing this Sunday, April 10 through September  In addition a new Chinatown/North Beach event is scheduled for this summer (TBA).  The season finale will be held on October 23 in the Mission. We hope to see […]