Transit on the Information Highway: Web 2.0 and the public process

"Web 2.0–shorthand for Internet applications that rely on users to generate content–has the potential to transform transit systems and operations, while also enabling the general public to collaborate directly with public agencies. Andy Nash, a veteran transportation and land use planner based in Vienna, Austria, will present his latest research on how Web 2.0 has improved planning, efficiency and reliability and public participation. Nash’s talk will build on his past experiences conducting research at ETH Zurich’s Institute for Transport Planning and Systems and, in the 1990s, as executive director of the San Francisco County Transportation Authority." 

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