San Francisco Absorbs the Reality of President Trump

An Inauguration Day Open Thread

Protesters blocked Market Street this morning to protest Trump. Photo: Streetsblog
Protesters blocked Market Street this morning to protest Trump. Photo: Streetsblog

Today, Donald Trump became the 45th President of the United States.

In downtown San Francisco this morning a group of about 30 protesters blocked Market Street in front of Uber’s building, holding a banner that said “Uber Collaborates with Trump.” (see above photo). This is because Uber’s CEO Travis Kalanick is on Trump’s economic advisory team. The F-Market Line and a host of buses were stopped by the protest. Cyclists and motorists were forced to make U-turns across wet Muni tracks and find another way to get to work.

BikesReversingOnMarketStreet

There were also protests in front of City Hall and there was a small march on the north end of Market Street, near the Embarcadero.

Protests are planned or already took place in Oakland as well.

A few more images below.

CityHall
A protest in front of City Hall. Photo: Streetsblog SF
Protesting collaboration between Uber and Trump? Photo: Streetsblog
Market Street Cycles had a “resist” banner in front of its door. Photo: Streetsblog

Leave comments about what the reality of President Trump means to you, your city, what you have seen around the Bay Area today, and how you intend to resist the policies of his administration.

In the meantime, if you’re looking for coping strategies, there’s “Make America Kittens Again” for the Chrome browser. It replaces all photos in stories about Trump with pictures of kittens. Additional ideas for getting through the next four years are welcome.

This is what today's post looks like with the "Make America Kittens Again" Chrome extension.

 

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