Streetfilm: Making a Better Market Street

Just about everyone who visits San Francisco’s grand Market Street is awed
by its hustle and bustle, the myriad modes of transportation, and some
of the beautiful architecture the city hosts. But just about everyone
also agrees that Market Street has a much bigger potential as a people
space that accommodates its users in more efficient and human terms.
Parts of the street are in disrepair; whole blocks contain more boarded
up facades than functioning businesses.

Streetfilms was able to talk to many advocates who would like to see
a different configuration of Market Street. Folks who have already
invested time in making it better, and thoughts from passerby who use
it as a daily commuting option. It’s fair too say not all ideas are
universal accepted across all with a stake in Market Street, but
hopefully their thoughts can serve as a springboard to a bigger
discussion on what to do when the street is finally re-examined and
re-paved.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Bikeway on Mission Street Would Cost More Than One on Market

|
Constructing raised, protected bike lanes on downtown Mission Street would cost more than building them on Market, according to SF Municipal Transportation Agency Director Ed Reiskin. The Mission bikeway proposal, which recently surfaced as an option to be studied in the repeatedly-delayed Better Market Street project, would entail abandoning long-sought bike safety improvements on Market, which is […]

At 40 Years, San Francisco’s Transit-First Policy Still Struggles for Traction

|
The first private automobile users on early 20th-century American streets were generally accorded no special privileges on the public right-of-way. “The center of the road was reserved for streetcars, and the new automobiles had to move out of the way,” as Renee Montagne describes it in the 1996 documentary Taken for a Ride, which chronicles […]

An Emerging New Bike Plan for San Francisco is a Bold Path Forward

|
After four years of an agonizing bicycle injunction that prevented the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) from adding any significant improvements to the city’s bike network, a judge earlier this year finally freed the SFMTA to begin building out the city’s long-promised Bicycle Plan. In short order, the SFMTA made some very noticeable improvements, […]