SF’s rapid transit network

From SPUR:

In 2003 voters passed Proposition K, containing funding for Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) on Geary and Van Ness to bring the quality and reliability of light rail to two of San Francisco’s busiest transit corridors. Nearly eight years later, is BRT still on the way, and where is the next stop? Join us for a joint project team presentation and discussion withTilly Chang and Rachel Hiatt from the San Francisco County Transportation Authority, and Paul Bignardi and Timothy Papandreou from the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency.

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Is the Geary Bus Rapid Transit Project in Jeopardy?

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Photo: plug1 If the Geary Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) project doesn’t get some love from advocates and the general public, the project could be in trouble, according to several people closely following the process. "I look to the left, I look to the right, all I see is opposition and criticism," says Joel Ramos, a […]

What’s the Hold Up for Van Ness BRT?

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For what’s intended to be a relatively quick, cost-effective transportation solution, San Francisco’s first Bus Rapid Transit route on Van Ness Avenue has been a long time coming. Planners first conceived the project in 2004, and as late as two years ago, it was scheduled to open in 2012. Since then, construction has been pushed back […]

Parking-First “Save Polk Street” Crowd Attacks Van Ness BRT

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“Save Polk Street” has aimed its parking-first agenda at Van Ness Bus Rapid Transit. A couple dozen speakers protested the project an SFMTA hearing last week, distributing fearmongering flyers [PDF] claiming that removing some parking and banning left turns would “kill small businesses,” back up car traffic, and make the street more dangerous. The long-delayed Van Ness […]

Geary BRT Plan Watered Down to Appease Parking-Obsessed Merchants

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Update: This plan may not be “watered down” after all. See our follow-up report here. Planners are touting a new proposed configuration for Geary Bus Rapid Transit that would forgo bus passing lanes in order to preserve car parking to appease merchants. Separated, center-median bus lanes would be retained, and project backers hope the changes […]