SPUR Forum: SF’s Long Range Transportation Plan

From SPUR:

Should San Francisco extend the Central Subway to Fisherman’s Wharf? Or cable cars to Japantown? Should we prioritize bus-rapid transit on Geary or to Potrero/Bayshore? Should we focus our limited resources on maintaining our system, or get new resources to help expand service where Muni is most crowded? Answering these questions is part of the task of the San Francisco County Transportation Authority, who will use this forum explore the tough questions and unveil different scenarios for transportation investments to support the city’s growth.

Generously sponsored by the Yerba Buena Community Benefit District.

Liz Brisson, San Francisco County Transportation Authority
Rachel Hiatt, San Francisco County Transportation Authority


Annie Alley
San Francisco, CA 94105-4015
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ADMISSION
Free to members
$10 for non-members
Okay to bring lunch

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