Today’s Headlines

  • Rope on Muni Electric Trolley Arms Comes Loose at Market and Main, Injuring Four (SFGate)
  • Dogpatch Residents Upset About Proposed Muni T-Third Turnaround Loop (Curbed)
  • More on Muni’s Efforts to Improve Declining Metro Service (SFBay)
  • SFPD Captain: Cyclist Ran Stop With a “Sense of Entitlement,” Was “Menace to Public Safety” (SF Exam)
  • Protestors Blocking Housing Development on Site of Hayes Valley Farm (SF Appeal, KTVU 1, 2)
  • CAHSRA Makes Deal With Tutor Perini, Central Subway Contractor With Contentious History (SacBee)
  • Former BART Head Made $330,000 by Cashing in on Unused Vacation Days After Resigning (ABC)
  • Mercury News Repeats CHP’s Erroneous Assertion That Cyclists Can’t Ride Two Abreast
  • GJEL Attorney: Cyclists Can Be Deemed Responsible for Doorings in Some Situations
  • Mountain View City Council to Approve Budget Advancing 13 Bike/Ped Safety Projects (PTA)
  • Pleasanton Driver Hits Cycling Couple, Killing Woman (SFGate)
  • Fremont Driver Arrested for Causing Crash That Killed Son, Wife (NBC)

More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • The Examiner story is pretty funny. There is all sorts of references to the fact he was a cyclist. They buried the lede – felony warrant, meth and crack possession.

  • mikesonn

    Narratives…

  • tony
  • Gary

    SFPD Captain: Cyclist Ran Stop With a “Sense of Entitlement,” Was “Menace to Public Safety”

    He doesn’t mention how many more cars are a menace and real danger every day. Police one-sidedness.

  • Jeffrey Baker

    “A new procedure will also roll out at the end of this month at the Embarcadero station with the hopes of speeding up service. The time allotted for trains to turnaround will be reduced to three minutes, said Haley.

    Currently, each train is given five minutes in the schedule to make the turnaround from inbound to outbound. An analysis showed that only 10 percent of trains were able to complete the turnaround on schedule.”

    Does anyone know more about this? Simply lowering the time from 5 to 3 isn’t going to work if they already can’t do it in 5. Hopefully they are going to send those slack-jawed yard operators to early retirement as part of this change.

  • Anonymous

    The whole “cyclists can’t ride two abreast” thing drives me nuts. I love how motorists get all over cyclists for this while, meanwhile, *every* single car is designed to have two people abreast. Why is it okay for cars to be twice as wide as needed but not okay for cyclists to ride two abreast?

  • Anonymous

    Actually, virtually all cars are designed for three people abreast. And when they’re parked on the street that’s like having three bicyclists abreast that are just standing there chatting.

  • Ryan Brady

    I really want to just chill on my bike in the middle of a busy street. Maybe with some hazard lights rigged up. Anyone honks and I’ll say HOLD UP I’M JUST HERE FOR A MINUTE.

  • mikesonn
  • Andy Chow

    A pedicab can hold two to three people abreast on the back and it can fit within the bike lane. Two people riding bikes abreast is more like two cars driving abreast. You need room between the two bicycles or two cars for safety.

    I have nothing against the idea of two people riding abreast but consideration should be taken not to block traffic. It is harmful to themselves and others by blocking traffic (it encourages people to do unsafe things). Even heavier vehicles like trucks and buses have to pull aside when it is moving slowly up the hill and there’s a long line of cars behind that truck or bus.

  • Anonymous

    “Two people riding bikes abreast is more like two cars driving abreast.”
    Uh, no. Even two people with crappy bike handling skills can ride abreast in the exact same lateral footprint as a passenger vehicle. And three skilled riders can ride abreast in the footprint of a bus.

    Not that I’m saying three abreast is a good idea. Nor am I saying that bikes shouldn’t pull aside when it’s safe to let other traffic pass. But there are many lanes that aren’t wide enough for a vehicle and a bike to ride safely alongside each other that are safe enough for two bikes to ride side by side.

  • Anonymous

    Bikes traveling down the road do not “block” traffic–bikes traveling down the road *are* traffic. Check your bias.

  • Andy – seriously, do you just make up the most ridiculous sounding things possible to goad others into rebutting it?

  • we are reminded over and over about “swarms” of cyclists in Portola Valley. When Spectrum is on Portola Road, they are probably 8 across withing the traffic lane (at the speed limit, FYI)

  • Anonymous

    Everyone should be super happy he was on a bike and not driving.

  • Anonymous

    Everyone should be super happy he was on a bike and not driving.

  • Andy Chow

    Bikes are slower moving traffic. Unless there’s a safety reason, cyclists do not have the right to deny other vehicles to safely pass the cyclist, nor do motorists have the right to stop cyclists to safely pass cars to get ahead of the line waiting for red lights.

  • mikesonn

    *here is a series of words* [I think Murph is onto something]

  • gneiss

    Only if there are 5 vehicles getting ‘backed up’ behind the slower moving traffic (CVC 21656). My experience is that drivers make unsafe moves and get impatient around cyclists prior to that condition ever getting reached.

  • gneiss

    Only if there are 5 vehicles getting ‘backed up’ behind the slower moving traffic (CVC 21656). My experience is that drivers make unsafe moves and get impatient around cyclists prior to that condition ever getting reached.

  • gneiss

    Only if there are 5 vehicles getting ‘backed up’ behind the slower moving traffic (CVC 21656). My experience is that drivers make unsafe moves and get impatient around cyclists prior to that condition ever getting reached.

  • Andy Chow

    If the cyclists are riding single file and there’s plenty of space on the lane itself, other vehicles can safely pass the cyclists without problems. I don’t think they need to pull over like trucks and buses do when they climb uphill on a two lane road.

    There’s no problem with cyclists riding abreast until potential conflict arises. Common sense should be that if possible faster vehicle should be allowed to safely pass. I think that some people here just love bike/car confrontation to prove that they’re right.

  • Speaking of 2 abreast. For the death in Pleasanton, the driver has not been cited, and they are investigating.

    Here is a statement from a knuckledragger in the Pleasanton PD.

    “One factor in the investigation is whether the Hersevoorts were riding
    side by side or one behind the other on Foothill, and whether they were
    both in the bike lane alongside the two-lane road, said Pleasanton
    police Sgt. Robert Leong.”

    This is an irresponsible statement. Maybe Sgt. Leong included other things and the Chronicle refrained from printing them, like “One factor in the investigation is whether or not the motorist was using a handheld device”

    A difference between those two items – using a handheld device is illegal.

    What really irks me is this – the thinking goes that if they were riding side by side, then the leftmost rider would be out into the roadway. If that’s the problem – how exactly did the driver manage to hit *BOTH* cyclists?

  • gneiss

    I disagree. Some of my most memorable conflicts with car drivers are riding single file, well spaced out, *down* Pan Toll Highway and Sequoia Valley drive. Even when we might have been going at or only 5 mph below the speed limit motorists not backed up will honk, pass dangerously and yell obscenities. Ironically, climbing is easier because you can pick your way along the edge of the road more easily and cars can pass quickly. Descending, though, you need to take the lane since the pavement edge is more dangerous at higher speed and this creates conflict, even though you are traveling closer to the speed limit.

    It still boggles my mind how going 5 mph below the limit is considered ‘holding up’ traffic by some motorists.

  • gneiss

    It reminds me of how people use the term ‘jaywalking’ when referring to crossing at unmarked crosswalks where it is legal to cross the road. Somehow the custom of only crossing where there are cross walks has morphed into jaywalking if they aren’t there, and police, when interviewed, merely reinforce that perception by providing pithy quotes regarding ‘a pedestrian not crossing at a marked crosswalk’, like that is somehow illegal.

    If the police would stop editorializing about the ‘unsafe’ behavior of victims, we’d have a much more sane environment on our streets.

  • Andy Chow

    I am not pretending that all drivers are reasonable. There are many jerks out there who don’t respect cyclists even when cyclists gave space to motorists. These folks don’t even have the patience to deal with other motorists who choose to drive carefully.

  • Anonymous

    I’m not very convinced by either side of this argument. I have been biking like the iamtraffic folks for years and still get regularly buzzed by motorists who just can’t figure out how to pass a cyclist safely, or others on a power trip who are set on antagonizing people on bikes whenever possible. The real answer for dealing with high traffic situations is segregated facilities, and lower traffic speeds so when collisions occur they are less often fatal.

    When it comes to country roads where bike-specific facilities are not practical we should at least be sure that our traffic laws have enough teeth and high enough penalties so that drivers take their responsibilities seriously and think twice (or three of four times) about negligent behavior.

  • Anonymous

    Right, two cyclists riding abreast is not noted as illegal in the CVC, which means it is legal. Other code sections regarding holding up slower traffic still apply, but this doesn’t inherently have anything to do with people biking two-up. Would two bikes welded together be illegal to ride in the street, ever? No? Then two unconnected bikes next to each other is fine as well.

  • Andy Chow

    I pay attention and make room to cyclists when I drive. This awareness comes from the fact that I also ride bikes and for a time pedicabs. The auto/bike conflict is not so much on the vehicles themselves rather than the quality of drivers, which many of them have little or no experience with bikes. Having some experience and awareness goes a long way.

  • mikesonn

    I posted that because Andy doesn’t seem to grasp why people would take the lane on a bike. Yes we need better [read: protected] infrastructure but we don’t right now so in the meantime we have to deal with people like Andy on the road that feel like we don’t belong there. This leads to getting #jerrybrowned or worse.