Bay Area Bike Share Releases Pricing and Membership Details

##http://bayareabikeshare.com##BayAreaBikeShare.com##

Bay Area Bike Share just got more official with a new website, Facebook and Twitter account.

The Bay Area Air Quality Management District announced the system’s new social media presence along with its pricing and membership details:

Membership rates to join Bay Area Bike Share will be $88 for an annual pass, $22 for a three-day pass and $9 for a daily pass. Each pass provides for unlimited trips during the membership period, with no additional cost for the first 30 minutes of each trip. Trips that exceed 30 minutes will incur surcharges.

Officials say the exact launch date within August will be announced next month, and memberships will go on sale July 15.

The website also says the system will have a smartphone app showing station locations and bike availability. Oh, and the first 1,000 people to sign up for annual memberships “will receive unique Founder Keys in their welcome package.” Nice.

Those who haven’t taken a liking to the celeste color proposed for the bikes — a number of readers have called for “international orange” instead — may be disappointed. At a SPUR forum yesterday evening, BAAQMD’s Karen Schkolnick explained that a different shade of orange was originally considered for the system, but it didn’t work out. “When the manufacturer went through different stages of testing, the quality just wasn’t there,” she said. “We had to pick another color,” and celeste “was the next, most amazing, best choice.”

It’s also worth noting that Bay Area Bike Share will be equipped with GPS on its bikes, which will allow its managers to collect a detailed level of real-time usage data, according to SFMTA staff.

Seleta Reynolds, a planner at the SFMTA’s Livable Streets Subdivision, noted that one advantage of the small size of the pilot launch is that it can show what a large impact even a small system can have. Reynolds quoted New York Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan, who launched the nation’s largest bike-share system on Memorial Day, in her speech in San Francisco last week. “Bike-share is a gateway drug,” she said.

“Maybe, bike-sharing’s most important use is in places that are just on the cusp of turning the corner on bike mode split,” said Reynolds. “It normalizes bike riding.”

  • Grabbing a bike at a bart station and riding to your destination instead of fighting MUNI could be 5-10 minutes each way – a lot more in a meltdown.

  • Anonymous

    Only the good quality Bianchi bikes are celeste green. That way you could easily tell their lower quality stuff.

  • caryl

    According to the FAQs on the BABS website, if you arrive at a full station, the kiosk will direct you to a nearby station with available docks and will add 15mins of free time to your trip. Doesn’t completely solve the problem you’re concerned about, but at least you won’t be charged for the time it takes you to get to an available dock. You can also get real-time bike & dock availability info using their smart-phone app. Seems pretty cool!

  • From what I understand there will be an evaluation, and they need to raise funding (this system is very expensive per bike…), etc.

  • Anonymous

    Still you’re gonna be “docking” your bike, not parking it. Nobody parks a bike…

  • bourbon

    What in the world are you on about? I’ve never owned a car. I ride a bike, and I always use the word “park” for bikes. For example, I constantly lament the lack of “bike parking” in many parts of SF.

  • Anonymous

    I usually say “lock” for my bike and that there’s “nowhere to lock my bike.” Or, “will it be safe to lock up there?” I guess I do say bike parking in the general sense, but lock is a more appropriate term for the action. I think for bike share the term dock is most appropriate.

  • About youth and mobility sharing:

    Bay Area Bike Share has a minimum age of 18 http://bayareabikeshare.com/faq, but at:
    Citi Bike it is 16 http://citibikenyc.com/faq
    Capital Bike Share it is 16 http://capitalbikeshare.com/faq
    Hubway it is 16 https://www.thehubway.com/signup
    Nice Ride it is 16 https://www.niceridemn.org/faq/
    B-Cycle Denver it is 15 http://denver.bcycle.com/About/FAQs.aspx

    There are some restrictions for minors such as having parents co-sign in several of these or requiring a driver’s license (ha ha…) in Denver, but please consider that kids can start driving at 15 1/2 with some restrictions, and no helmet (required until the 18th birthday in California.) Carshare operators have a minimum age requirement even further away from when a younger adult may drive on their own.

    Internationally, based on research I did in 2010 for the presentation here http://db.tt/M6vdraSk (pg. 33), I found that Bixi in Montreal and Velib in Paris have a minimum age of 14, and both Bike Mi in Milano and Bicing in Barcelona allow use at 16…

    Consider that the driving age in the mentioned EU countries is 18, which means that they have rules completely opposite to San Francisco.

    Though some U.S. states have tighter rules on licences for minors then they use to, it goes without saying that changing licensing age to 17 or 18 is nearly impossible (no matter how many lives it would save). At the very least Bay Area Bike Share should allow membership with conditions at the same age one can drive a car alone. (Ideally, helmet requirements would be done away with completely in the State of California, or at least changed from age 18 to 16.)

    Bike share (and carshare) can be great tools to encourage a new mobility culture, so they need to be as inclusive as possible.

  • I had my bike saddle stolen a few weeks ago outside the Metreon. Great sadness (plus an enormous pain to bike back home standing entirely on my pedals.) Not having people mess with my bike would be the number one reason I would use bikeshare in SF, but I agree with other commenters that I am unlikely to take Muni to get to docking station in order to use the system. If/when bikeshare exists in the East Bay, I would combine it with BART to extend my transportation reach. (It would, for instance, be my preferred way of getting to IKEA.)

    (My new bike seat now has a chain locking it to the frame. People who steal bikes and/or bike parts are evil, evil, evil.)

  • Anonymous

    Mine was stolen outside SF MOMA. I think that area is a prime spot for bike thieves. Fortunately, my ride back to Caltrain sans saddle was short. I learned that standing without a saddle is much harder than with one since most people use the nose of the saddle for things like signaling turns. And potholes are much worse when you’re out of the saddle.

  • Anonymous

    It’s a US-based problem. This is not nearly the big issue internationally as it is in US cities, what with our commercial vs. residential splits. That said, I never had a major problem in DC with this. Density and number of bikes are vital, however, and it doesn’t look like SF will have that for now.

  • Anonymous

    Totally. The pricing is steep for the rollout we’ve got. It’s a fair price for a fully fleshed out citywide system. Bike share systems work best with annual memberships, high density of bikes, and point-to-point trips. Take a bike to the store, hope a bus home with the bags. Take the train to work, but grab a bike on the way home because the weather is beautiful. (and so on…)

    Check out http://sfbikeshare.sfmta.com and suggest new stops or vote for others.

  • Anonymous

    I encourage everyone who realizes this system is way too small compared to other bike shares in the US and internationally (way too small compared to those) to vote for stops here:

    http://sfbikeshare.sfmta.com

    And support your supervisors in helping grow the system. Bike share is the best way to get new (non-asshole) bikers onto our streets, and is one of the cheapest, greenest, healthiest forms of travel available, even for casual or occasional use. I’m not a “biker” but living in Paris with the Velib completely changed my life, even though I still don’t ride a personal bike today.

  • Anonymous

    Given that women cyclists are an indicator species for the perception of safety, and many non-cycle commuters think of urban cycling as only for the male, brave, and fit, I think a gentle “feminine” image is an overall positive.

  • “About youth and mobility sharing:

    Bay Area Bike Share has a minimum age of 18
    http://bayareabikeshare.com/fa…, but at:
    Citi Bike it is 16 http://citibikenyc.com/faq
    Capital Bike Share it is 16 http://capitalbikeshare.com/fa
    Hubway it is 16 https://www.thehubway.com/sign
    Nice Ride it is 16 https://www.niceridemn.org/faq
    B-Cycle Denver it is 15 http://denver.bcycle.com/About

    There are some restrictions for minors such as having parents co-sign in
    several of these or requiring a driver’s license (ha ha…) in Denver,
    but please consider that kids can start driving at 15 1/2 with some
    restrictions, and no helmet (required until the 18th birthday in
    California.) Carshare operators have a minimum age requirement even
    further away from when a younger adult may drive on their own.

    Internationally, based on research I did in 2010 for the presentation
    here http://db.tt/M6vdraSk (pg. 33), I found that Bixi in Montreal and
    Velib in Paris have a minimum age of 14, and both Bike Mi in Milano and
    Bicing in Barcelona allow use at 16…

    Consider that the driving age in the mentioned EU countries is 18, which
    means that they have rules completely opposite to San Francisco.

    Though some U.S. states have tighter rules on licences for minors then
    they use to, it goes without saying that changing licensing age to 17 or
    18 is nearly impossible (no matter how many lives it would save). At the
    very least Bay Area Bike Share should allow membership with conditions
    at the same age one can drive a car alone. (Ideally, helmet requirements would be done away with completely in the State of California, or at
    least changed from age 18 to 16.)

    The planned exclusionary rules affect not only the population as a whole
    but within peer groups: Imagine even a small group of 10th, 11th and
    12th graders (mostly age 16 to 18) out together in the City. The chance
    to be spontaneous and check out shared bikes will not be possible for
    everyone so then no one will get them, or even worse some may get bikes
    while others will not. And everyone can drive together (or ride on
    collective public transportation…)

    Bike share (and carshare) can be great tools to encourage a new mobility
    culture, so they need to be as inclusive as possible.”