Skip to Content
Streetsblog San Francisco home
Streetsblog San Francisco home
Log In
Bicycling

Are We Smarter Than a Third Grader? On Livable Streets, Maybe Not.

The inspiring and, in a way, infuriating story of Elli Giammona popped up on the Streetsblog Network over the weekend.

MT.jpgLivable streets prodigy Elli Giammona. Photo: The Missoulian

Elli is a 9-year-old in Missoula, Montana who a couple of years ago began to question why she couldn't bike to school.
When her mother explained that it wasn't safe because the road leading
from their home to Hellgate Elementary -- a typical suburban arterial,
from the looks of it -- didn't have a sidewalk, Elli took action.

With
encouragement from her mom and the help of her younger sister and older
brother, she petitioned Missoula County, gathering signatures and
composing a letter explaining the benefits of a walkable Mullan Road. The Missoulian reports:

The letter is dated Jan. 14, 2009, around the time [county public works director Greg] Robertson waslooking for a project eligible for American Reinvestment andRecovery Act dollars. Criteria? A quick turnaround, a project inthe urban area, and one uncomplicated by problems like right-of-waynegotiations and extra environmental reviews.

"Honestly, I didn't have any other projects for consideration atthe time that would have met the criteria," he said.

Long story short: A new trail is expected to be finished in time for Elli to ride it to school next fall.

Not
only has Elli made it safer for herself and her neighbors to ride a
bike or take a walk, she's also made plain how completely the stars
must align for something as simple as a car-free ribbon of asphalt to
become reality. (Even now, the planned Missoula trail won't connect
with the school because of right-of-way costs.) Just a few decades ago
a kid riding or walking to school would be considered the epitome of
American wholesomeness. Now it's a symptom of child neglect, in part because of infrastructure so obviously inhospitable that even a 7-year-old gets it.

Maybe,
above all, Elli Giammona and her family have given us hope for a future
in which full-grown adults get it too. One where it won't take an act
of Congress to get a child to school safely.

Stay in touch

Sign up for our free newsletter

More from Streetsblog San Francisco

Call to Action: Next Step to Save the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge Bike Lane

There are six lanes on the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge. Drivers still want all of them. The fight to reserve one for people not in cars continues.

May 23, 2024

Alameda Installing Unprotected Bike Lanes on Park and Webster

How many Tess Rothsteins and Maia Correias have to die in dooring crashes before Bay Area cities stop accepting door-side lanes as an acceptable solution under any circumstances?

May 23, 2024
See all posts