Transit and Job Growth: Lessons for SB375

From SPUR:

This spring the Public Policy Institute of California will complete a series of reports on Senate Bill 375, the land-use portion of the state’s climate change law. Using original research on transit-oriented development from 1992-2006, these reports include an analysis of changes in employment and job density around new transit stations in California. Join Jed Kolko, associate director of research at the Public Policy Institute of California, for a briefing on these reports.

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