What would 100,000 people per square mile look like?

From SPUR:

Density can take many different forms in urban environments. Come hear from three San Francisco architects as they share their take on what 100,000 people per square mile might look like and what it would take to get there. With David Baker of David Baker + Partners, Craig Hartman of SOM and Dan Solomon of Solomon Design Partners.

Cohosted with the San Francisco Chapter of the AIA and the San Francisco Housing Action Coalition. AIA CES credits pending.

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