Reclaim Market Street! Film screening: William H. Whyte’s “The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces”

From SPUR:

Urban planner William H. Whyte’s study The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces is a profound study of urban space. In the 1970s, using methods of direct observation—including photography, film and notation—Whyte and his research assistants compiled a survey of New York’s plazas, streets and sidewalks, examining pedestrian behavior and dynamics. In the film version of The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces (1988), Whyte presents his witty and insightful views on what makes public space thrive. Please join us for a free screening of this seminal film. This event is part of the Reclaim Market Street!exhibition. Running time: 58 minutes

Free to the public. Register here.

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