SPUR: Ideas that Matter, The Worlds of Jane Jacobs

From spur.org:

Event image

Image courtesy of Island Press

Jane Jacobs is history’s most celebrated urban critic. In addition to The Death and Life of Great American Cities, Jacobs authored other influential books and was a tireless advocate for vibrant neighborhoods. The new edition of Ideas that Matter: The Worlds of Jane Jacobs combines Jacobs’ writing with a biography and analysis by scholars to shed light on the development of her theories. Stephen A. Goldsmith, director of Center for the Living City (organizers of Jane’s Walk USA) will discuss Jacobs’ work and her relevance today. Co-presented with Island Press.

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