Hayes Valley Neighborhood Association Meeting

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Closed Crosswalks Remain Even in Today’s Walkable Hayes Valley

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Hayes Valley may be one of the country’s densest and most walkable urban neighborhoods, but believe it or not, it still has three closed crosswalks — vestiges of the mid-20th century’s cars-first planning. “For many years, traffic engineers devised ways to pen people in, so that cars weren’t inconvenienced,” said Walk SF Executive Director Nicole Schneider. “Nowadays, […]

New Study Analyzes Traffic Around Former Central Freeway

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The Central Freeway sections damaged by the Loma Prieta Earthquake in 1989 have been replaced by such a distinctive Octavia Boulevard, for many San Franciscans the double-decked behemoth that used to dominate the neighborhood has become a distant memory. Most of the traffic the freeway carried, however, has not disappeared and now city planners are […]

Two-Way Hayes Extension is a Step Closer, Though Obstacles Remain

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Cars whipping around the corner of Gough and Hayes, where pedestrians can only cross three ways There was widespread government and public support for a two-way, traffic-calmed Hayes Street between Gough and Franklin at the Board of Supervisors’ Land Use and Economic Development Committee meeting today, but there is a fundamental disagreement with the MTA […]

Two-Way Hayes Street Proposal Wins Approval at SFMTA Hearing

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A plan to restore two-way traffic on several blocks of Hayes and Fell Streets in Hayes Valley that were converted to one-way streets in the 1950s was approved at an SFMTA hearing today following a strong show of support from residents, merchants and neighborhood associations. It now goes to the SFMTA Board for approval. The […]

Neighborhood Outreach Continues for Fell and Oak Bikeways

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Fourteen years of community-driven efforts to improve conditions on Fell and Oak Streets around the Panhandle are finally paying off. The outreach continues on a vision for separated bikeways that would provide San Franciscans safe access to the flattest route connecting the western neighborhoods to areas east while making the neighborhood more livable for residents and businesses. […]