SPUR Young Urbanists: Doing good through economic activism

"How do we harness our economic power for change? Patronizing businesses and services whose practices coincide with our political or social values is one effective way. We will speak with three organizations that reinforce "good" behavior by encouraging educated commerce, microlending and philanthropy. Join us to learn more about how you can use your buying power more effectively. With a representative from Kiva.org, Brent Schulkin from Carrotmob and Daniel Kaufman from the One Percent Foundation. This event is generously sponsored by the Koret Foundation."

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French Flair and Bullet Trains at Rail~Volution’s California Day

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The Rail~Volution conference at the San Francisco Hyatt concluded yesterday with three hours of presentations and break-out meetings about California High-Speed Rail. The focus: how to build the communities we want around HSR stations in Los Angeles, San Jose and Fresno. An important part of that was to learn from the experts: the French designers […]

Panel Asks: How do We Get More Diversity in Bike Advocacy?

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Yesterday evening, the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition (SFBC) held a discussion about diversity as part of its “Bike Talks” series at the Sports Basement Grotto on Bryant Street. Janice Li, Advocacy Director for SFBC, moderated a panel comprised of Lateefah Simon, President of the Akonadi Foundation, Tamika Butler, Executive Director of the Los Angeles County […]

Urbanism in the Age of Climate Change

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Editor’s note: Today we are very pleased to begin a five-part series of excerpts from Peter Calthorpe’s book, “Urbanism in the Age of Climate Change.” Keep reading this week and next to learn how you can win a copy of the book from Island Press. I take as a given that climate change is an […]
An image of the Bay Area, without parochial concerns. Photo: MTC

SPUR Talk: Metropolitanism versus Local Control in the Bay Area

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Since the United States declared its independence, there’s been a fight about whether government should be centralized for efficiency, or things should be run from local townships and communities to maintain the closest connection between citizens and the people who govern them. “In California, that division is reflected in our Constitution,” explained Louise Dyble, an […]