Modeling the region’s future

From SPUR:

As the Bay Area debates and develops its first combined Regional Transportation Plan and Sustainable Communities Strategy, the modelers at the Metropolitan Transportation Commission and the Association of Bay Area Governments are busy. They are analyzing how far our regional decisions about transportation investments, policies and land-use changes will get us towards goals of reducing greenhouse gas emissions and driving. Learn how the regional models work and why they are important for regional planning. With David Ory from the Metropolitan Transportation Commission and Michael Reillyfrom the Association of Bay Area Governments.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

An image of the Bay Area, without parochial concerns. Photo: MTC

SPUR Talk: Metropolitanism versus Local Control in the Bay Area

|
Since the United States declared its independence, there’s been a fight about whether government should be centralized for efficiency, or things should be run from local townships and communities to maintain the closest connection between citizens and the people who govern them. “In California, that division is reflected in our Constitution,” explained Louise Dyble, an […]

Plan Bay Area Passes in a Room Full of Paranoid Conservative Activists

|
Plan Bay Area, the 25-year regional development and transportation funding strategy, was approved by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission and Association of Bay Area Governments last night. The commissions passed a plan that includes some highway expansions and won’t meet the region’s own goals for sustainable transportation, according to projections, but which nevertheless represents a step forward for smart […]
Image: Seamless Bay Area

Advocacy Group Fights to Put the Transit Customer First

|
Note: Metropolitan Shuttle, a leader in bus shuttle rentals, regularly sponsors coverage on Streetsblog San Francisco and Streetsblog Los Angeles. Unless noted in the story, Metropolitan Shuttle is not consulted for the content or editorial direction of the sponsored content. Imagine if the Bay Area’s 27 transit agencies took the same tickets, billed passengers by the same rate for distance traveled, and all […]