Today’s Headlines

  • SFPD Van Driver Hits Pedestrian Who Was Drunk and Jaywalking, According to SFPD (SF Weekly)
  • SFMTA Board Approves Citywide Expansion of On-Street Car-Share Parking (SFGate)
  • Bike-Share Coverage From Bryan Goebel at KQED, PA Online; and Why Marinites Should Sign Up
  • After Compromise, Board of Supervisors Approves CEQA Appeal Reform (SFGate, SF Examiner)
  • More on the Supes Committee Approval of New Bike Parking Requirements (SF Examiner)
  • SF Examiner Covers the Planning Department’s “Living Alleys” Project in Hayes Valley
  • BART Union Leader Won’t Back Down, Rules Stacked Against Scabs, Board Member Blasts Unions
  • With Muni Operators Asking for Private Restrooms, Atlantic Cities Looks at Other Transit Operators
  • ABC Goes For the Pulitzer: Two Drivers Who’ve Experienced Glitches With Electronic Bridge Tolling
  • People Behaving Badly: Drivers Nearly Doubling 35 MPH Speed Limit on the Presidio Parkway
  • De Soto Cab Launches App to Compete With Ride-Share (ABC), Uber Adds Fare-Splitting (NYT)

More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • mikesonn

    So now you can beat those segments in your car!

    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/code-of-the-curve/id652853980?mt=8

  • Anonymous

    RE: People behaving badly and speeding

    What’s really frustrating about people when they get pulled over for going nearly double (!!) the speed limit is how they think it’s kind of funny and silly. As they are interviewed, it’s all giggles and smiles and excuses: “Whoops, I didn’t know it wasn’t 65” (yeah, that’s BS), or “I didn’t know it wasn’t a construction zone, hah, hah, hah … isn’t that funny that I’m so silly and got caught?” But this is the damn problem with cars: nobody appreciates just how incredibly dangerous they are. It’s literally a joke to people that they are hurtling 4000 lbs of steel down the road way too fast. Until they kill somebody of course, and then it’s all about how it was a tragic accident and obviously there was nothing they could have done to prevent it … such BS. This is why our cities are so overrun by automobiles and why it’s so hard to fix: people don’t even believe it’s a problem, and you can’t fix a problem you don’t think you have. Interviewing these clowns just confirms this.

    I’m glad to see cops out pulling these people over, and they shouldn’t be wasting a single cop performing stings on bicyclists rolling through stop signs with nobody around when cars continue to decimate the livability of our cities.

  • Mark Dreger

    Food for thought: this recent UC Berkeley study found that drivers, on average, yield to pedestrians in the crosswalk 90% of the time. But drivers of luxury cars are almost as likely to run an intersection than yield as they should.

    The science behind it is pretty impressive.

    http://www.upworthy.com/take-two-normal-people-add-money-to-just-one-of-them-and-watch-what-happens-next?c=to1

  • Good segment. Just want to note that this is the same study Streetsblog Capitol Hill covered yesterday: http://usa.streetsblog.org/2013/07/16/study-wealthier-motorists-more-likely-to-drive-like-reckless-jerks/

  • Guest

    Indeed, I was wondering where I first stumbled across this. 🙂

  • Anonymous

    If its the same study as Streetsblog DC reported on, I was under the impression that drivers were found to yield to pedestrians only about 65% of the time, not 90%.

    “…35 percent of all drivers failed to yield to pedestrians, compared to 46 percent of those driving the fanciest cars.”

  • Anonymous

    The Presidio Parkway is something else. Remember, currently, they’ve only completed the first half of the project, so the entire freeway is as wide as the one it replaced. Once they finish the second half, it’ll be about double the width, but the capacity will still be limited by the bridge, so it’ll almost never be crowded.

    So we’ll have a 2 mile segment through the Presidio which is designed for speeds of 80 mph+, according to the modern standard, tucked between the bridge on one side, and city streets on the other. They could’ve scaled it down a bit, made the design speed lower, and saved hundreds of millions of dollars, but no. I have no idea what the designers were thinking. People are going to die.