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Today: VTA Board Could Enshrine Road Expansions in Sales Tax Measure

1:08 PM PDT on June 4, 2015

Santa Clara County's proposed 20-year sales tax could go toward making dangerous mega-wide roads like the Lawrence Expressway even wider. Photo: Santa Clara County
Traffic congestion has worsened on Lawrence Expressway over the past decade, but has remained steady or lessened along Santa Clara County’s other urban expressways. Photo: Santa Clara County

The Valley Transportation Authority Board of Directors today could enshrine road widenings in its 20-year transportation sales tax, proposed for the ballot in Santa Clara County in November 2016.

The agenda for today's 5:30 p.m. board meeting includes approval of the sales tax measure language, which includes goals [PDF] to "provide congestion relief" and "relieve roadway, highway, and expressway bottle necks and minimize traffic in residential neighborhoods."

"In the past this goal was met with roadway widening," wrote Gladwyn d’Souza, transportation committee chair for the Sierra Club's Loma Prieta chapter, in a letter [PDF] to the VTA board stating the organization's concerns about the language. "Subsequent analysis has shown that the relief is temporary due to induced driving."

The sales tax proposal, called Envision Silicon Valley, would fund at least two decades of transportation infrastructure projects in the South Bay, including the BART extension to San Jose, a network of bus rapid transit lines, a county-wide trail network, and safety improvements for walking and bicycling.

But widening Santa Clara County's already-dangerous expressways to "relieve bottle necks," even as traffic declines, would work against San Jose's goals to reduce driving and end traffic fatalities, as called for in San Jose's Envision 2040 General Plan and Vision Zero plan. Ninety-three percent of traffic fatalities occurred on major city streets and county expressways last year.

"It's a fact that our transportation systems have been designed in the past to move cars efficiently," SJ Transportation Director Hans Larsen told the City Council when it approved the Vision Zero plan on May 12. "This is a change in paradigm to say that safety is the top priority."

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