Muni Plans to Launch “Double Berthing” in October, a Year Behind Schedule

Photo: ##http://www.flickr.com/photos/robvillanueva/6815095381/in/photostream/##RobVSF/Flickr##

Muni still hasn’t launched double loading of trains in its metro stations, a.k.a. “double berthing,” but says it could finally happen in October — a full year after the original launch date.

“The project is still in testing, to debug issues with the platform signs and trains,” said Muni Operations Director John Haley. “According to our project manager, they are progressing and hope to have it installed in October.”

Last September, Haley had told us that the train control software had been upgraded, and that computer-only simulations of allowing two trains to board passengers in a station simultaneously proved successful. The tests had “been positive with no bugs or glitches found,” Haley said at the time.

When they ran the live field tests, however, Muni managers apparently found some bugs.

Muni did, however, successfully start running a three-car train to make short runs in its metro stations last October, as promised.

  • the_greasybear

    Every transit improvement in San Francisco seems to take years longer than it would anywhere else.

  • helloandyhihi

    Mayor Ed Lee not only lacks leadership in improving transit, he’s a declared enemy of sustainable transportation, even going so far as to vow to punish city leaders who work toward fixing Muni now.

  • runn3r85

    It still amazes me how behind these projects always seem to get. In any other industry, there would be accountability and actual consequences for being behind schedule or not informing on the progress. Meanwhile our tax dollars continue to be wasted and they want us to trust them with even more money… Time for some restructuring at SFMTA.

  • davistrain

    It’s not just SF, I think getting anything done in any large American city takes longer than would seem necessary. The only exceptions seem to have been sports stadiums, and in the case of transit, the original San Diego Trolley line to San Ysidro. I think one of the problems is getting bureaucrats out of their “comfort zones”. I recall hearing about one city where the local transit agency resisted attempts to build a railway system because the managers were happy to be running a bus operation without adding anything new to their responsibilities.

  • alex

    As always they take an excessive amount of time to get anything done. Hopefully we’ll get to see this happen soon and if Muni only had more trains because the three car train is very convenient.

  • When you see a city like Buenos Aires do BRT and pedestrian streets in less than a year, it really does make you wonder if we over-think, over-engineer, and over-lawsuit-proof everything we do here in The States. http://www.streetfilms.org/buenos-aires-building-a-people-friendly-city/

  • tungwaiyip

    The truth is this is more like 15 years behind schedule. Such a rocket science to put two trains in stations that’s designed to support this.

    Google should take over Muni operation.

  • Jeffrey Baker

    I was going to say 40 years, but anyway, yes. And yes to the other part too.

  • andrelot

    BRT is a third-world solution, and the accident rate of all transit modes in Argentina (their unsafe subway, decrepit rail and crappy buses) is much times higher than in US.

    Thank God more attention to safety is paid in US than in Argentina!

  • Caltastrophe

    In the 90’s, with the old Boeing LRVs, Muni ran 4 car mixed trains in the subway. They would (de)couple individual lines at West Portal.

  • GDT

    Strange. I visited Argentina a few years ago, and NYC’s oldest trainsets are more rickety than the subway train I rode on. Secondarily, there was a rather nice, new luxury commuter train that I paid a full 7 pesos to ride on — very expensive by Argentina standards.