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Election Day Finds Two Livability Champions on the Ropes

10:00 AM PDT on November 2, 2010

Rep. Jim Oberstar (D-MN) will likely lose his chairmanship of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, as control of the House is widely expected to shift to the Republicans after today's election. But Oberstar could also lose his seat in Congress.

Oberstar, right, and DeFazio share a ride in a pedi-cab. ##http://willametteriverbridge.blogspot.com/2010/09/congressman-jim-oberstar-d-minnesota.html##Willamette River Bridge Project##
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As committee chair, Oberstar has been a strong advocate for transit investment and livability reforms. He's also the architect and chief proponent of the six-year $500 billion transportation bill that's been stalled in the House since last summer.

Oberstar has easily won 17 consecutive elections, but the 18th is proving to be a little sticky. The LA Times reports:

[R]ecently, American Crossroads, an independent group affiliated with GOP strategist Karl Rove, started running spots on the Duluth stations that blanket the area. A group formed by Democrat-turned-Republican Dick Morris also launched a spot against Oberstar.

Then a third group called 60 Plus, which bills itself as a conservative alternative to AARP, began broadcasting $100,000 worth of ads saying it was time for the 76-year-old incumbent to retire.

Now, Oberstar's seat is in play.

According to polling by SurveyUSA, he's currently just one point ahead of challenger Chip Cravaack, within the margin of error. And he's not the only champion having to fight harder than usual to retain his seat.

It's being portrayed as a testament to the power of anti-incumbent sentiment this year that Peter DeFazio (D-OR) finds himself in a surprisingly close race against Republican Art Robinson. DeFazio, as chair of the Highways and Transit Subcommittee, has strongly advocated for including livability measures in the transportation bill.

He won his last race with 82 percent, and no independent polls were even commissioned this time around -- his chances were considered that good. Conservative money has helped Robinson close the funding gap, though. And the only poll that's been conducted -- admittedly, by a Republican polling firm -- shows DeFazio just six points ahead. That's a lot closer than he expected this race to be.

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