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Bicycle Safety

New Ordinance Streamlines Conversion of Gas Stations to Ped-Friendly Uses

3:40 PM PDT on July 31, 2012

The SF Board of Supervisors today approved changes to the city's planning code to make it easier for developers to convert gas stations to uses like apartments and storefronts on major transit and pedestrian streets.

"Gas stations have a lot of [drivers] coming in and out, and they can slow down transit," said Judson True, an aide to Supervisor David Chiu, at a hearing of the Land Use and Economic Development Committee last week. "In a transit-first city, while we want to make sure there are some gas stations, on primary transit corridors, this allows them to be converted under certain parameters without a Conditional Use authorization."

By removing the hurdle of obtaining a Conditional Use permit -- an exemption from local planning regulations -- the amendment is intended "to balance the desire to retain [gas stations] with city policies which support walking, cycling, and public transportation, and which encourage new jobs and housing to be located in transit corridors," according to the Board of Supes' summary of the bill [PDF].

In addition to attracting car traffic that often blocks transit, bike lanes, and sidewalks, gas stations are voids in the urban fabric that degrade the pedestrian environment. On a block of Divisadero Street between Fell and Oak Streets, which is packed with three gas stations, street safety advocates held protests in 2010 calling for the closure of a driveway at an Arco gas station where drivers regularly block the bike lane on Fell. The situation improved somewhat after the SFMTA painted the bike lane green and removed parking spaces to create a longer queuing space. Though major street improvements are planned for Fell and Oak, the Arco entrance would remain mostly as it is, and it's unclear whether these routes would be considered primary transit or pedestrian streets.

The ordinance, which also includes a provision expanding the enforceable bike parking requirements within buildings, is part of a larger effort underway by Livable City and Supervisor Chiu to reform myriad aspects of the city's planning code. Stay tuned for more coverage of this ongoing campaign.

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